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To Kill a Mockingbird
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Home  ›  Departments & Staff  ›  Departments  ›  Language Arts  ›  Teacher Web Sites  ›  Stuart Whiteside  ›  Sophomore English  ›  To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

 

To Kill a Mockingbird UBD Unit Plan

Jump to current lesson plans

Subject: English

Course: English II

Grade: 10

Level: 2, 1, Honors

Mr. Whiteside: Stratford Public Schools

Concept: Defining self through adversity

Projected Dates of Unit: Marking Period 2, 7-9 weeks. Concurrent with CAPT Review.

Standard 1: Reading and Responding

Overarching Idea: Students read, comprehend and respond in individual, literal, critical and evaluative ways to literary, informational and persuasive texts in multimedia formats.

                    Guiding Question: How do we understand what we read?

                                Component Statements:

1.1 Students use appropriate strategies before, during and after reading in order to construct meaning.

1.2 Students interpret, analyze and evaluate text in order to extend understanding and appreciation.

1.3 Students select and apply strategies to facilitate word recognition and develop vocabulary in order to comprehend text.

1.4 Students communicate with others to create interpretations of written, oral and visual texts.

 

Standard 2: Exploring and Responding to Literature

Overarching Idea: Students read and respond to classical and contemporary texts from many cultures and literary periods.

Guiding Question: How does literature enrich our lives?

Component Statements:

2.1 Students recognize how literary devices and conventions engage the reader.

2.2 Students explore multiple responses to literature.

2.3 Students recognize and appreciate that contemporary and classical literature has shaped human thought.

2.4 Students recognize that readers and authors are influenced by individual, social, cultural and historical contexts.

 

Standard 3: Communicating with Others

                Overarching Idea: Students produce written, oral and visual texts to express, develop and substantiate ideas and experiences.

Guiding Question: How do we write, speak and present effectively?

Component Statements:

3.1 Students use descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive and poetic modes.

3.2 Students prepare, publish and/or present work appropriate to audience, purpose and task.

 

Standard 4: Applying English Language Conventions

Overarching Idea: Students apply the conventions of standard English in oral, written and visual communication.

Guiding Question: How do we use the English language appropriately to speak and write?

Component Statements:

4.1 Students use knowledge of their language and culture to improve competency in English.

4.2 Students speak and write using standard language structures and diction appropriate to audience and task.

4.3 Students use standard English for composing and revising written text.

District and Content Standards
ENGLISH / LANGUAGE ARTS / READING

1. Students read, write, speak, listen, and view to construct meaning of written, visual, and oral text.
2. Students choose and apply appropriate strategies that facilitate the development of fluent and proficient use of the language arts including the use of technology.
3. Students use language in visual, oral, written, and performance-based forums.
4. Students write in the four modes of discourse (description, narration, exposition, and persuasion) for various purposes and audiences.
5. Students examine, understand, and respond to a variety of literature from diverse cultures and historical periods.
6. Students employ processes that encourage them in becoming independent, life-long learners in English Language Arts.

Enduring Understanding/Big Idea:

The novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, forces the reader to examine the causes and social effects of various types of bias and prejudice.

Individuals benefit from valuing others perspectives and seeing things through the eyes of others.

The society affects the individual.

There are often roles and expectations for individuals in society.

Coming to terms with reality versus perceptions is an aspect of maturity.

Individuals have the capacity for good and evil.

 Societies are often reluctant to change.

Students read, comprehend and respond in individual, literal, critical and evaluative ways to literary, informational and persuasive texts in multimedia formats.

Students read and respond to classical and contemporary texts from many cultures and literary periods.

Literacy is improved through the study of vocabulary.

The study of vocabulary enriches our appreciation and comprehension of literature.

The study of vocabulary should be a lifelong activity.

Essential Questions:

How does right living depend on awareness, willingness and courage?

How can prejudice and superstition lead to injustice?

What responsibility do individuals have to protect the innocent?

What happens when people fear what they do not understand?

How can gender stereotypes influence people’s behavior?

How does the most important part of a child’s education take place outside of the classroom?

How do appearances not always reflect reality?

How do people tend to judge others by their own standards?

How can one person release evil into a community?

What is the real meaning of courage?

How is an individual influenced by the past?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What is Critical Stance?

What are Connections?

How do we improve literacy through the study of vocabulary?

How does the study of vocabulary enrich our appreciation and comprehension of literature?

How do we make the study of vocabulary a lifelong activity?

How can we use vocabulary to become directly involved in constructing meaning?

How do integration, repletion, and meaningful use contribute to our vocabulary knowledge?

Subsidiary Questions:

·                     How are insight, maturity, understanding, and integrity not always related to age, social standing, or formal education?

·                     How is courage having the inner strength to do what you believe is right even when the odds of succeeding are poor?

·                     In what ways can an individual's attitudes, prejudices, and biases have roots in a collective past??

Topics: Coming of age, Gender, class, prejudice, bigotry, age, education, intellect, corruption, ignorance, hatred, breeding, family circle, innocence, tolerance, power, relationships, culture, Elements of literature, Literary devices, Reading strategies, see Study Guide.

Process: Reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, responding, interpreting, analyzing, persuading.

Skills: Use reading strategies, construct meaning, interpret text, analyze text, evaluate text, extend understanding, extend appreciation, select word recognition strategies, apply word recognition strategies, develop vocabulary, comprehend text, communicate interpretations of texts, create interpretations of texts, recognize literary devices, recognize conventions, explore multiple responses to literature, recognize Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought, appreciate Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought, recognize social, cultural and historical influences, use descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive modes, prepare work appropriate to audience, purpose and task, publish work appropriate to audience, present work appropriate to audience, use knowledge of their language and culture to, improve competency in English, speak using standard language structures and diction, write using standard language structures and diction, use standard English for composing written text, revising written text.

Assessment (including homework): See task assessments and rubrics.

Learning Activities /Tasks

Tasks

Bloom

Standards

Establish historical context of the 1930's through video, Riding the Rails streaming video. Riding the Rails journal entry, articles, non fiction text, art, and music. Demonstrate understanding through comprehension questions, journal entries, etc.

 

 

Review Essential Understanding and Essential Questions.

 

 

Complete scaffolding activities such as reading chapter one in class, read in class until the class is comfortable with the style, reading and discussing in class, character identification charts, graphic organizers and evaluate with rubric.

 

 

Learn vocabulary and take vocabulary test.

 

 

Research an aspect of the setting of the novel such as entertainment, social, historical, political, scientific, or art and music and create a persuasive piece about its effect on society and today.

 

 

Complete a setting activity such as a setting map, graphic organizer, characteristics of the South chart, or drawing.

 

 

Demonstrate an understanding of literary elements such as plot, point of view, theme, characters through chapter questions, quizzes and journals.

 

 

Demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives of the characters through an epilogue of the novel, etc…

 

 

Demonstrate an understanding of literary devices such as symbolism, imagery, irony, metaphor, etc…

 

 

Characterization Review notes. Characterization Activity.

Second Characterization Application Activity.

 

 

Roots of Racism Tree Graphic Organizer Project.

Project presentation and presentation notes.

 

 

Video, Video Journal, and video questions.

 

 

Culminating activity, i.e. mock trial

 

 

I.E.P. Lesson Modifications: Preferential seating. Extended time. Computer access. Prior notice of tests and assignments. Alternate setting. Organizational help. Cue expected behavior. Positive reinforcement. Check for understanding. Check work. Provide models. Repeat instructions. Encourage participation. Graphic organizers. Use of agenda. Repeat instructions. Multiple modalities. Communication with resource and home. Also see individual IEPs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Powered’ and ‘Unwrapped’ English Standards

Standard

Verbs/Skills

Nouns/Knowledge

1.1

use

reading strategies

1.1

construct

meaning

1.2

analyze

text

1.2

extend

understanding

1.3

select

word recognition strategies

2.1

recognize

literary devices

3.2

prepare

work appropriate to audience, purpose and task

3.2

publish

work appropriate to audience

4.1

improve

competency in English

4.2

write

using standard language structures and diction

4.3

composing

written text

4.3

revising

written text

 

Additional Sophomore English Standards

Standard

Verbs/Skills

Nouns/Knowledge

1.2

interpret

text

1.2

evaluate

text

1.2

extend

appreciation

1.3

apply

word recognition strategies

1.3

develop

vocabulary

1.3

comprehend

text

1.4

communicate

interpretations of texts

1.4

create

interpretations of texts

2.1

recognize

conventions

2.2

explore

multiple responses to literature

2.3

recognize

Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought

2.3

appreciate

Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought

2.4

recognize

social, cultural and historical influences

3.1

use

descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive modes

3.2

present

work appropriate to audience

4.1

use

knowledge of their language and culture to

4.2

speak

using standard language structures and diction

4.3

use

standard English for

 



 

M

11/7

Symbols

Test, Make-up, Essay

Collect books

Portfolios

D.O.L.

Binder Check

Read

 

HW: Read Chapter 1

Grammar. apostrophe

CAPT preparation

Elements of literature: Imagery, interpretation and analysis

5 min

5 min

10 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

No School

 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Sub Plans

 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

Collect books

Review Chapter 1

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 2

Unit plan orientation

CAPT preparation

Elements of literature: Thematic interpretation and analysis

Vocabulary

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

No School

 

 

Unit Plan, The Pearl, web site, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration

M

Review reading plan

Chapter 2

Quiz

Questions

Journal

Review chapter

 

HW: Read Chapter 3

CAPT preparation

Elements of literature: Thematic interpretation and analysis

Vocabulary

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

Complete Chapter 3

Quiz

Questions

Journal

Reading plan reminder

 

HW: Read Chapter4

CAPT preparation

Elements of literature: Thematic interpretation and analysis

Vocabulary

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Progress check:

Complete Chapter 4

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 5

CAPT preparation

Elements of literature: Thematic interpretation and analysis

Vocabulary

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

Chapter 5

Quiz

Questions

Journal

Vocabulary

Review Chapter 2 answers

Characterization

Riding the Rails

 

HW: Read Chapter 6

Reading comprehension

CAPT preparation

Elements of literature

Thematic interpretation and analysis

Vocabulary

Connections

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

Chapter 5

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 6

Reading comprehension

CAPT preparation

Elements of literature

Thematic interpretation and analysis

Vocabulary

Connections

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

M

Characterization

Review reading plan

Chapter 6

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 7

To analyze elements of literature: characterization.

To develop understanding of characters and prepare for analysis of characters as elements of themes.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

CFA

Characterization

Complete Chapter 7

Quiz

Questions

Journal

Reading plan reminder

 

HW: Read Chapter 8

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To assess student editing and revising progress.

To review test taking strategies.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Characterization Presentations

Progress check:

Complete Chapter 8

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 9

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

M

P 5 complete Characterization Presentations

Review chapter 5

Progress check:

Complete Chapter 9

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 10

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

To review important elements of the chapter and their importance to themes and the journal entry.

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 10

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 11

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

Review chapter

setting map

 

HW: Read Chapter

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

Review chapter

setting map

 

HW: Read Chapter

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

M

Map check- draft complete. Final due in about two weeks- add Ewells, Cunninghams, town dump, Tom Robinson’s

Review chapters 7-8

Progress check

 

HW: Read Chapter 14

To review important elements of the chapter and their importance to themes and the journal entry.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 15

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Read

Questions

Journal

 

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature and their importance to theme.

To interpret and analyze literature and the thematic connections.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

Roots of Racism Tree Graphic Organizer Project

 

HW: Read Chapter

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

Progress check

Roots of Racism Tree Graphic Organizer Project

 

HW: Read Chapter 17

To make historical connections to the novel.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

 

Riding the Rails

Vocabulary

symbolism, imagery, irony, metaphor, characterization

Video Journal, questions.

Culminating activity

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

 

 

M

Roots of Racism Tree Graphic Organizer Project

 

HW: Read Chapter 19

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature and their importance to theme.

To interpret and analyze literature and the thematic connections.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

Double periods

CFA

CAPT assessment.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Double periods

CFA

CAPT assessment.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

CFA review

Roots of Racism Tree Presentations and notes

Review chapter questions

Review Part I themes

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 20

To use CAPT assessment as tool for modifying instruction.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

15 min

15 min

5 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 21

To make historical connections to the novel.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

M

Review chapter questions

Review Part I themes

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 22

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature and their importance to theme.

To interpret and analyze literature and the thematic connections.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

Quiz

Questions

Journal

Eyes project

 

HW: Read Chapter 23

To use CAPT assessment as tool for modifying instruction.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Eyes project closure

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 24

To use CAPT assessment as tool for modifying instruction.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

Review chapter questions

Review Part I themes

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 25

To use CAPT assessment as tool for modifying instruction.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

15 min

15 min

5 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 26

To make historical connections to the novel.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

M

No school

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature and their importance to theme.

To interpret and analyze literature and the thematic connections.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

Go to Guidance for Course selection

 

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 27

 

To use CAPT assessment as tool for modifying instruction.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Questions

Review Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 28

 

To use CAPT assessment as tool for modifying instruction.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 29

To use CAPT assessment as tool for modifying instruction.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

15 min

15 min

5 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

Quiz

Questions

Journal

 

HW: Read Chapter 30, 31

 

To make historical connections to the novel.

To assess student comprehension.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

 


 

CURRENT SOPHOMORE ENGLISH  LESSON PLAN

 

 

M

Viewing Journal

Viewing questions

 

HW: Essay,prepare for end of MP, prepare for midtems. make-up Quizzes, Questions, Journals.

To use video as a tool to access multiple modalities and increase understanding of objectives.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

T

Viewing Journal

Viewing questions

 

HW: Essay, vocabulary quiz, prepare for end of MP, prepare for midtems. make-up Quizzes, Questions, Journals.

To use video as a tool to access multiple modalities and increase understanding of objectives.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

W

Viewing Journal

Viewing questions

 

HW: Essay, vocabulary quiz, prepare for end of MP, prepare for midtems. make-up Quizzes, Questions, Journals.

To use video as a tool to access multiple modalities and increase understanding of objectives.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

45 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

Th

Viewing Journal

Viewing questions

 

HW: Essay, vocabulary quiz, prepare for end of MP, prepare for midtems. make-up Quizzes, Questions, Journals.

To use video as a tool to access multiple modalities and increase understanding of objectives.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

5 min

15 min

15 min

5 min

15 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

F

Viewing Journal

Viewing questions

 

HW: Essay, vocabulary quiz, prepare for end of MP, prepare for midtems. make-up Quizzes, Questions, Journals.

To assess 21st Century skills.

To use video as a tool to access multiple modalities and increase understanding of objectives.

To analyze racism as one central theme and trace its roots throughout the novel.

To illustrate the thematic structure of the novel and how smaller concepts are all part of a larger theme.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To analyze elements of literature.

To interpret and analyze literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s

 

 

Riding the Rails

Culminating activity

To improve vocabulary to increase comprehension and improve assessment performance.

 

 

 


 



 

 

Engaging Scenario for Unit

Scenario:

As a current student, you are acutely aware your world and, a result of reading this novel, you have become outraged at the injustice around you and you have decided to take a stand and make a difference.

Task:

Students will identify a current example of injustice and create a product to influence real world social change. For instance, students could draft and circulate a petition, create an informative poster or post a video on Utube.

 

 

 

 

Historical Perspective LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

·                     How is an individual influenced by the past?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

2.4 Students recognize that readers and authors are influenced by individual, social, cultural and historical contexts.

.

Major Activity

Historical Perspective

Purpose

Historical Perspective of novel

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, United Streaming video

 

 

 

Establish historical context of the 1930's through video, Riding the Rails streaming video. Riding the Rails journal entry, articles, non fiction text, art, and music. Demonstrate understanding through comprehension questions, journal entries, etc.

 

 

Enduring Understandings LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

·                     How does right living depend on awareness, willingness and courage?

·                     How can prejudice and superstition lead to injustice?

·                     What responsibility do individuals have to protect the innocent?

·                     What happens when people fear what they do not understand?

·                     How can gender stereotypes influence people’s behavior?

·                     How does the most important part of a child’s education take place outside of the classroom?

·                     How do appearances not always reflect reality?

·                     How do people tend to judge others by their own standards?

·                     How can one person release evil into a community?

·                     What is the real meaning of courage?

·                     How is an individual influenced by the past?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will read and copy enduring understandings and essential questions

Major Activity

Copy Enduring Understandings

Purpose

Exposure to Enduring Understandings

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 

 

Plot LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

How do we understand what we read?

How does literature enrich our lives?

How do we write, speak and present effectively?

How do we use the English language appropriately to speak and write?

How does paying attention to characterization aid in comprehension?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Methods of plot development.

Describe plot in novel.

Examine elements of plot.

Major Activity

plot notes and chart

Purpose

Literary element of plot

Parameters

20 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, students, text, chart, graph, notes

 

 

 

Scaffolding LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

How do we understand what we read?

How does paying attention to characterization aid in comprehension?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Describe plot in novel.

Examine elements of plot.

Examine story for thematic elements.

Major Activity

Chapter questions

Purpose

Comprehension and analysis

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, students, text, questions, notes

 

Comprehension LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

How do we understand what we read?

How does literature enrich our lives?

How do we write, speak and present effectively?

How do we use the English language appropriately to speak and write?

How does paying attention to characterization aid in comprehension?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Describe plot in novel.

Examine elements of plot.

Examine story for thematic elements.

Major Activity

Chapter questions

Purpose

Comprehension and analysis

Parameters

20 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, students, text, questions, notes

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Chapter Questions: To Kill a Mockingbird

Chapter I

1.                    What is the point of view?

2.                    What is the setting?

3.                    Identify the following characters with brief descriptions: Atticus, Jem, Scout, Dill, Boo, Miss Stephanie Crawford, Calpurnia

4.                    What is the Finch family history and heritage?

5.                    Who did Dill come to visit and why?

6.                    What did the children do for fun in the summer?

7.                    What is the reputation of the Radley House and why?

8.                    What did Arthur (Boo) and the Cunninghams do to get arrested?

9.                    What was ironic about the punishment of going to the state school?

10.                 Why do you think Arthur (Boo) did what he did with the scissors?

11.                 What did Dill dare Jem to do and what did Jem do?

12.                 What happened to the shutters afterwards and why?

Closure for each chapter: Demonstrate your awareness of a theme of the chapter by writing a one page journal entry. Consider:

·          the events of novel,

·          your interpretation of the theme,

·          the literary style and

·          your personal experience.

Journal Entry: Tolerance, acceptance and compassion.

·          What does Jem think about making a turtle come out of its shell?

·          What is Dill's reaction and what does he think about it?

·          How does Scout take it literally and what does this say about how she understands the world?

·          How could making the turtle come out be a metaphor for tolerance, acceptance and compassion?

Chapter 2                       

1.                    Where did Dill go in September?

2.                    What made Scout NOT miss him so much?

3.                    Who took Scout to school and why?

4.                    What did Miss Caroline look like?

5.                    How did Scout learn to read?

6.                    How did Scout learn to write?

7.                    What did Miss Caroline think of Scout's literacy?

8.                    Who was Walter Cunningham and why do the Cunninghams always pay in trade?

9.                    What does Scout do that upsets the teacher?

10.                 Why do you think Miss Caroline was having so much trouble?

Journal Entry: The importance and value of school and education to a society.

·          Where does a society get its sense of how to behave and what is right and what is wrong?

·          Consider : Common education, Moral education, Home values, Peer groups and The community.

·          What does Scout's experience with school indicate about education? ...Burris Ewell's experience (in chapter 3)? ...Walter Cunningham's experience?

·          What does Jem's understanding of the Dewey Decimal System indicate about education?

·          What about the use of rulers and punishment?

·          How does education fail these individuals? What is education good for then?

·          How does it help employers, the government, the town, the law, families?

·          What does it perpetuate?

Chapter 3

1.                    Why was Scout fighting with Walter?

2.                    How does Jem show he knows more about manners and human relationships than Scout?

3.                    Why can't Walter pass the first grade?

4.                    How does Scout embarrass Walter and what does her family think about her behavior?

5.                    What does Atticus think of Scout’s idea to get rid of Calpurnia and what does it show about how he feels about Calpurnia?

6.                    What does Burris Ewell think of school?

7.                    How does Scout feel about school?

8.                    Why does Cal treat Scout differently when she gets home from school?

9.                    What is Atticus' advice to Scout about Miss Caroline?

10.                 How do local officials handle the Ewells and why?

11.                 Do you think it is right in the long run?

12.                 According to Atticus, how can you get along better with folks?

13.                 What deal do Atticus and Scout make?

Journal Entry 3: Lifestyles: The influence of our environment on the way we live.

·          How are lifestyles influenced by the surroundings and families people live in?

·          What is the influence of heritage and culture?

·          Why are there differences between eras and time periods?

·          What is the value of manners and are they important?

·          Why are there so many differences in the ways people live?

Chapter 4

1.                    How did Scout rate the educational system of Maycomb?

2.                    What did Scout find in the knothole?

3.                    What did Jem tell her do with it and why?

4.                    How has Cal and Scout’s relationship changed?

5.                    What happens on the way home on the last day of school and how did it affect Jem?

6.                    What does Calpurnia mean when she says not to believe the story about Hot Steams?

7.                    Where did Scout and the tire end up?

8.                    What new game did Dill, Jem, and Scout plan?

9.                    Who catches them?

10.                 What were the two reasons Scout intended to quit playing the game?

11.                 Why do they continue playing the game anyway?

Journal Entry: Superstition, beliefs, perspectives, perceptions, and the way people see things.

·          What do the kids in the book believe in?

·          What do they believe that you think is immature?

·          What kinds of things can you think of that little kids believe in?

·          What do you remember believing as a kid?

·          What kinds of things do you believe now that your parents tell you is immature?

Chapter 5

1.                    Whose companionship did Scout seek and why?

2.                    What did Scout find out about Boo's personality from her?

3.                    How do people know Mr. Arthur isn't dead?

4.                    What do you think Miss Maudie meant by 'foot-washing' Baptists?

5.                    What is the difference between the way Miss Stephanie and Miss Maudie Atkinson handle information and knowledge?

6.                    Is Miss Maudie ridiculing religion when she says something about worrying about the afterlife?

7.                    What is the significance of "Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on the public streets"?

8.                    How do the children try to communicate with Boo and why were they unsuccessful?

9.                    What did Atticus show us about himself when he caught the children playing around the Radley house?

10.                 What was Jem's mistake in falling for the oldest lawyer trick on record?

Journal Entry 5: Male and female gender roles and traditions.

·          What is Calpurnia's role as a woman?

·          How does Scout fit the role of girly vs. tomboy?

·          What does Jem do that seems traditionally male?

·          What does this say about the expectations people have for girls and boys?

·          What gender roles do you see in your life?

·          Do you do everything the way you are expected to?

Chapter 6

1.                    What did the children catch Mr. Avery doing from his porch?

2.                    What do the children plan to do?

3.                    Why do they choose this particular time?

4.                    What doubts does Scout have about Jem's strategy?

5.                    What scared the children on the back porch?

6.                    What disturbed the night?

7.                    How did Jem manage to get through the fence?

8.                    Do the neighbors suspect it was Jem in the yard and how do we know?

9.                    In what embarrassing situation did Jem find himself and how did he explain it?

10.                 Why did Jem go back, and why?

Journal Entry 6: Privacy, confidentiality, secrecy, discretion.

Chapter 7

1.                    What condition were Jem’s pants in when he found them?

2.                    What did the children find in the knot-hole?

3.                    Whom did the carvings represent?

4.                    How do they react to the carvings?

5.                    What do Jem and Scout decide to do about the presents?

6.                    What happened to the knot hole and why do you think it happened?

7.                    Why do you think Jem was crying?

8.                    What could the knot hole be a symbol of or a metaphor for?

Journal Entry: Communication and understanding.

Chapter 8

1.                    Who died?

2.                    What did Scout ask Atticus and why?

3.                    What strange and almost unnatural event occurred in Maycomb and according to Mr. Avery, what caused it?

4.                    Who does not like the snowman and why?

5.                    What happened to Miss Maudie's house?

6.                    What does Jem tell Scout about worrying?

7.                    What had been placed around Scout's shoulders and who did it?

8.                    What does Jem tell Atticus and what is Jem beginning to think of Boo?

9.                    Why did Miss Maudie refuse to share her recipe with Miss. Stephanie?

10.                 How does Atticus react to Jem’s stories about Boo and what do you think Atticus thinks of Boo?

Journal Entry: Right and wrong and the forces of good and evil.

Chapter 9

1.                    What did Cecil Jacobs do that made Scout mad?

2.                    What do some townsfolk think about Tom Robinson's defense and why did Atticus accept the case anyway?

3.                    What did Atticus ask Scout to do and why?

4.                    What bad habit has Scout picked up and how does she think it might benefit her?

5.                    What Christmas presents did Jem and Scout receive from Uncle Jack?

6.                    What did Francis get?

7.                    Why was Aunt Alexandra upset about Scout’s attire?

8.                    What does Francis say about Dill and how does Scout react?

9.                    What criticism does Francis make about Atticus and what did Scout do?

10.                 Why is Scout so angry with Uncle Jack and how does she show that she forgives him?

11.                 How are Jack and Atticus different in the way they treat children and why?

12.                 What is Maycomb’s usual disease and why is Atticus concerned about it?

13.                 Why did Judge Taylor select Atticus to defend Tom?

14.                 How did Atticus inform Scout of what was to come?

Journal Entry: The effect of social status and race on equality, justice, and fairness.

Chapter 10          

1.                    Why are the children 'ashamed' of Atticus?

2.                    What is the significance of the 'mockingbird'?

3.                    What are some of Atticus' talents?

4.                    Who does Tim Johnson belong to and what is wrong with him?

5.                    Who is Miss Eula May?

6.                    Who is Heck Tate?

7.                    What was so ironic about Mr. Tate asking Atticus to take the rifle?

8.                    What shows Atticus' modesty and humility?

9.                    Why did Atticus stop hunting?

10.                 What is the significance of Jem's saying, "Atticus is a gentleman, just like me?"

Journal Entry: The effect of poison and disease both physically and as a metaphor.

Chapter 11

1.                    Why didn't the children like Mrs. Henry Dubose and how does Atticus want Jem to react to her?

2.                    What did Jem do with his birthday money?

3.                    What did Jem do to Mrs. Dubose's flowers and why?

4.                    What were his punishments and what book did he select?

5.                    Why does Scout 'hate" Atticus?

6.                    What does Atticus warn Scout about?

7.                    How did Mrs. Dubose act and what stopped each day's reading and why?

8.                    How has Jem's attitude toward Mrs. Dubose changed?

9.                    What happened to Mrs. Dubose and why did Atticus think Mrs. Dubose was the bravest person he ever knew?

10.                 In what emotional state is Jem at the end of the chapter and why?

Journal Entry: Disability, disease, and handicap. purity, innocence, freedom, don't owe anyone anything

PART II: Chapter 12

1.                    What was the importance of Calpurnia addressing Jem as "Mister Jem'?

2.                    What had happened in Dill's family?

3.                    Why was Atticus away and what was he like as a representative?

4.                    What problem did Calpurnia face concerning church?

5.                    What are some of the similarities and differences between Scout's church and Calpurnia's?

6.                    Why was the singing done by 'lining' and who among the congregation can read?

7.                    Why did they have to raise money for Mrs. Robinson?

8.                    How did Calpurnia learn to read?

9.                    What has been her relationship with the Finch family?

10.                 Who was waiting at home for them?

Journal Entry: Culture/influence of community/ cultural values

Chapter 13

1.                    Why do you think Atticus agreed to have Aunt Alexandra come to live with them?

2.                    What do the organizations Alexandra belongs show about what she is like?

3.                    What criteria does Alexandra use to judge people?

4.                    What ironic remarks do Atticus and Jem make about the quality of people?

5.                    How was Scout’s definition of "Fine Folks" different from Alexandra’s?

6.                    How does a system based on social class, a "caste system", work?

7.                    What was Atticus trying to say in his speech about the Finch’s ‘gentle breeding'?

8.                    What was unusual about Atticus and what line does he say for the third time?

9.                    What is the significance of the last paragraph in Chapter 13?

10.                 What is the purpose of most of this chapter?

Journal Entry: Class Issues/ superiority and inferiority

Chapter 14

1.                    Whom did Scout think was in trouble at first and why?

2.                    What did Alexandra want?

3.                    How did Atticus’s response show his tactfulness?

4.                    What happens between Jem and Scout and why is this a triumph for her?

5.                    Who is under Scout's bed and why?

6.                    What did Jem do about it that broke the code of childhood?

7.                    What is the situation in Dill's family and does Scout understand?

8.                    Which story line is picked up again at the end of the chapter?

Journal Entry: Traditional family values

Chapter 15

1.                    What was Dill's plan to make Boo come out?

2.                    Who appears at the Finchs' door and who do they think are most likely to make trouble?

3.                    What is 'change of venue' and how would it help?

4.                    Who is Link Deas and who were some of the other people there?

5.                    What does Atticus suspect will happen at the trial and what does he wish to see happen?

6.                    How can you tell if Jem understands why the men had come to Atticus that night?

7.                    What does Alexandra think about the Robinson case?

8.                    What was Sunday in Maycomb like and how was it different?

9.                    Why did Atticus go to the jail and what happens?

10.                 How does Scout break the tension with the angry mob considering the craziness of 'mob psychology’?

11.                 What does Jem's refusal to obey Atticus show about Jem?

12.                 Who was Mr. Underwood and how would he have helped Atticus?

13.                 What indication do you have that Atticus appreciates the children's intervention after all?

Journal Entry: The power of the mob/ group mentality/ peer pressure

Chapter 16

1.                    What big event was everyone going to in town?

2.                    How does Alexandra show her hypocrisy?

3.                    What is Atticus' explanation of the mob?

4.                    What did Atticus forbid the children to do?

5.                    What upset the old man about Atticus defending Tom Robinson?

6.                    Who is Mr. Dolphus Raymond really, and what is his reputation?

7.                    Why would Mr. Dolphus Raymond choose the life he does?

8.                    Where did Scout, Jem, and Dill sit in court and what does it say about their attitudes?

Journal Entry: Questioning institutionalized racism.

Chapter 17

1.                    Who was Mr. Gilmer and what was he like?

2.                    What two facts does Atticus want to make clear in Sheriff Heck Tate's testimony?

3.                    How does the Ewell's house contrast with the cabins in the ‘Negro’ settlement.

4.                    How many Ewell children are there and who is Mayella?

5.                    Summarize Bob Ewell's testimony under direct questioning by Mr. Gilmer.

6.                    What does Reverend Sykes suggest to Jem?

7.                    Contrast the behavior, language, and attitude of Bob Ewell and Judge Taylor.

8.                    What three points does Atticus bring out in his cross-examination of Mr. Ewell?

9.                    What was Atticus trying to establish?

10.                 What were Jem and Scout's assessments of the possible outcome?

Journal Entry: The power if ignorance versus education

Chapter I8

1.                    What is your first impression of Mayela Ewell?

2.                    What is ironic about 'Don't be afraid on anybody here, as long as you tell the truth'?

3.                    Summarize Mayella’s testimony under direct examination by Mr. Gilmer.

4.                    What points does Atticus try to make in his cross-examination of Mayella?

5.                    What is there about Tom Robinson that immediately shows he is innocent?

6.                    Although Atticus has discredited the testimony of the Ewell's, why doesn’t he disrespect them?

7.                    What kind of judge is John Taylor?

8.                    How many witnesses will Atticus call?

9.                    Who do you think they will be?

Journal Entry: The influence of our upbringing.

Chapter 19

1.                    Briefly state Tom's side of the story.

2.                    Where were the other seven children when Mayella was attacked?

3.                    Before the cross-examination by Mr. Gilmer, who interrupts on Tom's behalf? According to Tom, what does Mayella say about kissing?

4.                    Under cross-examination, what seem to Tom's two worst 'faults'?

5.                    Why did Dill cry at the trial and why can he relate to Tom?

Journal Entry: Our beliefs about race. Racial issues.

Chapter 20

1.        What is Mr. Dolphus Raymond really like and why did he pretend to be different from what he was?

2.        What is Mr. Raymond's opinion of Atticus?

3.        How does Jem think the case will go and why?

4.        What is he forgetting?

5.        What did Atticus do that the children found so unusual?

6.                    What is unusual about Atticus’s clothing during his final summation?

7.                    What does Atticus argue are some of the reasons that Tom should not be convicted?

8.                    How does Atticus end his summation?

9.                    What does Atticus do in court that the children never saw him do even at home?

10.                 What feeling do both Tom and Atticus have for Mayella?

11.                 What does Atticus say is a great leveler?

12.                 Why does Mr. Raymond share this secret with the children?

13.                 Why does Mr. Raymond pretend to drink?

14.                 Does Atticus say that kissing Tom was a crime?

Journal Entry: Going against society.

Chapter 21

1.                    Who walks down the middle aisle carrying a note to Atticus and why?

2.                    What things are strange about the courtroom during the wait for a jury decision?

3.                    Scout compares the atmosphere in the courthouse before the jury returns to another time and place. What is the time and place?

4.                    Why is Reverend Sykes not sure that the jury would decide in favor of Tom Robinson?

5.                    Why does Reverend Sykes ask Scout to stand when her father passes and how does he address Scout?

6.                    Why does Reverend Sykes’s voice seem distant after the decision even though he is standing next to Scout?

7.                    Why does Atticus walk down the middle aisle?

Journal Entry: Respect, appreciation, and diversity.

Chapter 22

1.                    What does Aunt Alexandra call Atticus and what does it indicate?

2.                    What does Jem mean when he says "It ain’t right"?

3.                    What does Dill plan to do with his life?

4.                    Miss Maudie normally gives the children a small cake each but what does she do this time?

5.                    What did the neighbors do to show their appreciation of Atticus the next morning?

6.                    What does Mr. Ewell say and do to Atticus and why?

7.                    Why does Miss Maudie think that Atticus was appointed by the judge to defend Tom?

8.                    What kind of person does Miss Maudie say that Atticus is?

9.                    Why does it say that Dill makes rabbit-bites?

10.                 What is Aunt Alexandra’s response to the children’s going to court?

Journal Entry: The end of childhood innocence.

Chapter 23

1.                    Who on the jury first wanted an acquittal and how is it ironic?

2.                    What is Atticus’s response when the children ask him to borrow a gun?

3.                    What is a hung jury?

4.                    The jury contained white males from outside Maycomb but what are some missing groups?

5.                    What humorous remark does Atticus make when Ewell spits in his face?

6.                    What does Scout believe that Aunt Alexandra wants her to help choose?

7.                    Do you think Tom could get a fair trial with a jury of white males from outside Maycomb and why?

8.                    What is Atticus’ response when he was asked if he is afraid to fight?

9.                    Who is the type of person that Atticus says is trash?

10.                 Why could Miss Maudie not serve on a jury?

11.                 What does Aunt Alexandra call Walter Cunningham that angers Scout?

Journal Entry: Changing society.

Chapter 24

1.                    Where does the women’s missionary circle hold its meeting?

2.                    Where are Dill and Jem?

3.                    During what month does the chapter take place?

4.                    Why is Scout not allowed to go with Dill and Jem?

5.                    What special group are the women studying?

6.                    Who is conducting the study?

7.                    Stephanie Crawford tries to make Scout look bad in front of the others;

8.                    she says Scout might want to be a lawyer since she has "already commenced going to court." What does Scout say she wants to be when she grows up?

9.                    What bad news does Atticus bring home?

10.                 Mrs. Merriweather keeps saying there is someone the ladies needed to forgive. Who is it?

11.                 Who did Atticus take with him when he went out to talk with Tom's wife?

Journal Entry: Gender Issues. Being male or female.

Chapter 25

1.                    What does Jem order Scout not to kill?

2.                    Why do Jem and Dill go with Atticus to the Robinson Place?

3.                    What condition does Atticus make for the two boys to go?

4.                    What game are the children playing at the Robinson Place?

5.                    What tender gesture does Atticus make while waiting for Helen?

6.                    What is Helen’s reaction to seeing Atticus’s face?

7.                    What does Mr. Underwood do to confront society?

8.                    To what does Mr. Underwood compare Tom Robinson?

9.                    What does Mr. Ewell say when he hears of Tom’s death?

10.                 Why does Scout not tell Atticus what Mr. Ewell said?

Journal Entry: What does it mean "to kill a mockingbird?"

Chapter 26

1.                    What grade is Jem in in this chapter?

2.                    What grade is Scout in in this chapter?

3.                    How does Scout feel about the Radley Place now?

4.                    What newspaper does Miss Gates dislike?

5.                    What term does Miss Gates say means equal rights for everyone?

6.                    When does Scout see Atticus scowl?

7.                    Why is Jem trying to gain weight? How?

8.                    How does Scout define democracy?

9.                    What had Scout heard Miss Gates say on the courthouse steps?

10.                 Why does Atticus say that Jem would not talk about the courthouse?

Journal Entry: Can education overcome prejudice?

Chapter 27

1.                    What does Mrs. Jones say Mr. Ewell said when he lost his job?

2.                    When does Judge Taylor hear a strange noise?

3.                    Why does Helen walk a mile out of her way to get to work?

4.                    Who defends Helen against Mr. Ewell?

5.                    What noise did Judge Taylor hear?

6.                    During what month does this chapter take place?

7.                    What did Scout look like in her costume?

8.                    What are the nicknames for the Barber sisters?

9.                    What trick is played on the Barber sisters?

10.                 Who escorts Scout to the pageant?

Journal Entry: Rural, suburban and urban differences.

Chapter 28

1.                    What is the weather like on Halloween night?

2.                    Who scares Jem and Scout on the way to the auditorium?

3.                    Who frightens the children on the way to the auditorium?

4.                    What is Cecil Jacob’s costume for the pageant?

5.                    How much money does Scout have and how many things can she do with it?

6.                    Why does Scout miss her cue in the pageant?

7.                    Why did Scout leave her costume on for the walk home?

8.                    Why are the children among the last ones to leave the auditorium?

9.                    Why does Scout wear her costume home?

10.                 Why can Jem see Scout in the dark?

11.                 What scared Jem and Scout on the way home?

12.                 How many people scuffle under the tree?

13.                 Who does Sheriff Tate find has been killed in the scuffle?

Journal Entry: The safety of children.

Chapter 29

1.                    What did the sheriff find under the tree?

2.                    What is Atticus’s one sign of inner turmoil?

3.                    Why does Mr. Tate say it is all right that Alexandra had not heeded her feeling?

4.                    Why does Atticus want Scout to raise her head when she talks?

5.                    Why don’t the children go back for Scout’s shoes?

6.                    What does Scout call out to Cecil Jacobs?

7.                    Why do Atticus and Alexandra not hear the sounds outside?

8.                    Why does Mr. Tate say Mr. Ewell acted the way that he did?

9.                    How does Scout know that she is under the tree?

10.                 Who brings Jem into the house?

11.                 What does Scout say to the man who rescued Jem and her?

Journal Entry: Strength, power and powerlessness

Chapter 30

1.                    What is in the doctor’s package?

2.                    Why do they take Boo on the front porch?

3.                    In what order do they go out on the front porch?

4.                    What does the sheriff say had happened to Mr. Ewell?

5.                    What does Atticus say had happened to Mr. Ewell?

6.                    What comparison does Scout make with Boo?

7.                    For what does Atticus thank Boo?

8.                    How does Scout try to cheer Atticus up after Mr. Tate leaves?

9.                    What kind of knife was used to kill Mr. Ewell?

10.                 Where does the sheriff say he had gotten the switchblade?

Journal Entry: Legal versus moral.

Chapter 31

1.                    Why does Boo go inside the Finch house again?

2.                    Why does Scout walk with Arthur to his home?

3.                    Why does she ask Boo to take her arm?

4.                    Why does Scout go to sleep before the story is over?

5.                    Why does the doctor put a tent over Jem?

6.                    What book is Atticus reading and why is Atticus reading it?

7.                    What does Atticus say most people are like when you finally see them?

8.                    What makes you think Atticus does not believe Scout when she says she is not afraid?

9.                    What makes Scout sad in thinking back on all the gifts Boo had given them?

Journal Entry: Acceptance and tolerance.

 


 

 

 

Journal LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

What is Initial Understanding?

  What is Interpretation?

  What is Critical Stance?

  What are Connections?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Good literature can have an interesting story, literary devices that help unify the work, and a message about the human condition.

Major Activity

Chapter journals

Purpose

Comprehension and analysis

Parameters

20 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, students, text, journal questions

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

How do we understand what we read?

How does literature enrich our lives?

How do we write, speak and present effectively?

How do we use the English language appropriately to speak and write?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Increase vocabulary skills.

Good literature can have an interesting story, literary devices that help unify the work, and a message about the human condition.

Major Activity

Vocabulary Activity

Purpose

Vocabulary increases comprehension

Parameters

10 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, students, text, dictionary

 

 

 

Journal LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What is Critical Stance?

What are Connections?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Good literature can have an interesting story, literary devices that help unify the work, and a message about the human condition.

Major Activity

Journal Activity

Purpose

Journal writing increases literary analysis

Parameters

20 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, students, text

 

 

 

 

Journal Entry Sample

Events

The females in the book take on many traditional female roles. Calpurnia cooks, and raises and teaches the kids. Miss Stephanie gossips. Miss Maudie talks to Scout. The men, however, are more independent and controlling. Mr. Radley, apparently, uses his religion to control his family. Jem begins to act as if he doesn’t want Scout around and starts to tell her that she acts like a girl.

Themes

The story seems to show that there are specific roles for each gender. Girls cook like Calpurnia, gossip like Miss Stephanie and talk to each other like Miss Maudie and Scout. Boys apparently are smart, brave, and independent like Jem and Atticus.

Literary

The author is using the characters to illustrate her themes. She has developed the female characters of Scout, Miss Maudie, Miss Stephanie and the male characters of the Radleys, Atticus, and Jem to show the differences between the genders. Also, maybe the Radley house is being used as a symbol of how men can be oppressive and controlling.

Connections

I am a male chauvinist pig and I can identify with this story’s theme about gender because, as a male, I have always felt that I am smarter than the females in my classes. Like the main character Kino in the story, The Pearl, by Steinbeck, "I am a man" and therefore I feel I am superior. I can’t wait to get married so I will have someone like Juana to cook and clean for me.

Journal Entry Worksheet

Events

There are many events that have to do with ______.

Themes

The story seems to be saying something about ______. When the character ______ does _____ it is saying something about ______. Maybe ...

Literary

The author is using _____ to illustrate her themes. The ____ could be a symbol of ____. It was interesting to see the way the character of ____ was developed.

Connections

I can identify with this story’s theme about ___ because I had an experience with it. This is like the story, The Pearl, by Steinbeck, because it also deals with the theme of _____.

 

 

Characterization LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

How do we understand what we read?

How does literature enrich our lives?

How do we write, speak and present effectively?

How do we use the English language appropriately to speak and write?

How does paying attention to characterization aid in comprehension?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Methods of characterization.

Describe characters in novel.

Examine similarities and differences.

 

Major Activity

Characterization notes, chart and project

Purpose

Literary element of characterization

Parameters

20 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, students, text, chart, notes

 

 

 

Characterization Review Notes

Essential Understanding: Characters are created in a story through the literary device of characterization.

 

Characterization- All the methods used to present the personality of a character in a work of literature.

Direct characterization- the writer tells the reader explicitly what kind of person the character is. (Description).

Indirect characterization- The reader has to interpret information in order to ascertain a character's personality through:

·                     Things the character says or thinks

·                     Things the character does

·                     Things other characters think or say

·                     Things other characters do

Task:

Each student will create a characterization chart.

Support------------------------------Interpretation---------------------

Break into groups to complete the chart with at least four examples of how the character of Boo, Atticus, Scout, Jem, Dill, Mr. Radley, Calpurnia, and Aunt Alexandria is created.

·                     Share your group's work by creating a poster.

·                     After the activity, use the class notes and the class activity to answer the closure question at the bottom of your characterization chart:

Closure: How are characters developed in a story?

Characterization of _____________

Quote and Page

Summary and analysis

Support- find text from the novel about the character and cite it here

Interpretation- what that text leads the reader to believe about the character, the character's motivations, and the character's personality

."...the boys backed around the square in a borrowed flivver, resisted arrest by Maycomb's ancient beadle..." (10).

criminal, delinquent, problem with authority,

"...he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch..."(13)

.he was either starved by his parents, or just plain hungry.

."...Boo drove the scissors into his parents leg..."(11)

.Violent, doesn't like his parents, psychotic

.someday, maybe, Scout can thank him for covering her up. (72)

he's nice and generous.

..."Boo Radley.You were so busy looking at the fire you didn't know it when he put the blanket around you."

.Caring.He's not mean

..."Arthur radley just stays in the house,that's all." (49)

. This shows that he is shy and ,might not have any friends.

...But there came a day, barley within Jem'sw memory, when Boo Radley was heard brom and seen by several people." (10)

. He comes out sometimes and when he dies people are suprised to see him out of his house.

..." BooRadley, You were so busy looking at the fire you didn't know it when he put a blanket around you." (72)

. I

"Boo drove his scissors into his parents leg, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities" (11)

evil, sadistic, crazy...yo. messed up, dangerous, disturbed, mentally unhealthy, vindictive...werd.

" Mr. Radley kept him chained to the bed most of the time..." (11)

shows that Boo Radley isn't a normal person. He has the capability to really hurt someone

" Nobody knew what form of intimidation Mr.Radley employed to keep Boo out of sight, but Jem figured that Mr.Radley kept him chained to the bed most of the time.

Scared, ugly,dangerous, crazy

"Boo Radley. You were to busy looking at the fire you didnt know when he put the blanket around you.

Caring, nice

"...six-and-a-half feet tall...he dined on raw squirrels and any cat he could catch...long jagged scare...yellow rotten teeth...his eyes popped..." (13)

scary, monster, nuts, physically demented, tall, poor, sick-minded, inhumane

'Boo drove the scizzors into his pants, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants and resumed his activities."(11)

has no conscience, psycho, mentally disturbed, heartless

"boo wasnt crazy he was high-strung at time"(11)

normal like everyone esle ,shoud=

"Boo Radley, you were so busy looking at the fire that you didn't even notice he put a blanket on you."..(72)

Nice, Caring, Thoughtful, Matured over the years.

"Boo always spoke nicely when he was a boy"

he isn't a mean person; he is a gentleman (direct characterization)

."There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face; what teeth he had were yellow and rotten; his eyes popped, and he drooled most of the time. (13)

.he doesn't take care of himself; he's scary looking. (indirect)

"Boo stabbed Mr.Radley in the leg with his scissors".

.He wasn't crazy he was high-strung.-indirect.

."Mrs. Radley ran out into the street sceaming that Boo was going to kill them all." (11)

.Boo is dangerous but not crazy.-indirect

."Boo wasnt crazy,he was high strung at times. It was alright to shut him up at times.(11)

This means that boo has a short temper at times and often spazes out.(indirect).

"...Boo drove the scissors into his parents leg..." (11)

 

"...Boo was not be charged with anything:he was not a criminal (11).

 

."Boo wasn't crazy he was just high strung" (11)

 

"As Mr. Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent's leg, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activites." (11)

 

"Boo wasn't crazy,he was high-strung at times".(11)

 

"Other boys attended school while Mr. Radley locked Boo up for fifteen years" (10).

 

"He dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch" (13).

 

Closure: Write an answer to this question at the bottom of the page.

How are characters developed in a story?

 

 

 

Setting LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

·                     How does right living depend on awareness, willingness and courage?

·                     How can prejudice and superstition lead to injustice?

·                     What responsibility do individuals have to protect the innocent?

·                     What happens when people fear what they do not understand?

·                     How can gender stereotypes influence people’s behavior?

·                     How does the most important part of a child’s education take place outside of the classroom?

·                     How do appearances not always reflect reality?

·                     How do people tend to judge others by their own standards?

·                     How can one person release evil into a community?

·                     What is the real meaning of courage?

·                     How is an individual influenced by the past?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will examine setting of novel and connection to essential questions and themes

Major Activity

Map of Maycomb

Purpose

Show use of setting as literary device

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, notes, collaborative groups

 

 

 

Map of Maycomb

·                     write the following landmarks on sticky notes or small pieces of paper

·                     arrange the landmarks to make a map of Maycomb

·                     look at the clues in the novel and discuss ideas as a group

·                     (extra credit for additional landmark clues with page numbers)

·                     each student will redraw the map neatly showing all the significant landmarks.

·                      

o                                            Radley's place

o                                            Radley tree

o                                            The schoolyard

o                                            Finch's

o                                            Mis Maudie's

o                                            Miss Rachel's

o                                            Mr. Avery's

o                                            Miss Dubose's

o                                            Cunningham's

o                                            Underwood's

o                                            The courthouse

o                                            Center of town

o                                            Finch's Landing

o                                            The rabid dog

o                                            Street names

·                     Write a page that explains why you arranged the setting the way you did, using quotes and page #s from the novel

·                     Finally, answer the following question: How is the setting of the novel used as a literary device to enhance the novel's questions and themes?

 

 


 

 

 

#

Map of the novel project-page and evidence

4

"Maycomb, some twenty miles east of Finch's Landing, was the county seat of Maycomb County.(4)

6

"Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose's house, two doors to the north" (6).

6

"Jem and I heard something next door in Miss Rachel Haverford's collard patch" (6) S.F.

6

"The Radley's was three doors south(6)

8

"Routine contentment was improving our tree house that rested between giant twin chinaberry trees in the back yard, fussing running through our list of dramas based on the works of Oliver Optic (8)

8

"The Radley place jutted into a sharp curve beyond our house walking south it faced the front porch; the sidewalk turned and ran beside the lot. (8).

9

"The Maycomb school grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot. (9).

9

"From the Radley chicken yard tall pecan trees shook their fruits into the schoolyard. (9).

11

"The Radley's place three doors to the south."(11).

12

"The longer he would stand hugging the light pole on the corner"(12).

15

"They left the corner, crossed the side street that ran in front of the Radley house, and stopped at the gate (15)

33

"Two live oaks stood at the end of the Radley lot. (33)

35

"Cecil Jacobs, who lived at the far end of our street next door to the post office, walked a total of one mile per school day to avoid the Radley place and old Mrs. Lafayette Dubose.(35)

36

"We had strolled to the front yard, where Dill stood looking down the street at the dreary face of the Radley Place." [36}

37

"The tire bumped on the gravel and skeered across the road to the Radley's place(37)

43

"Every Christmas Uncle Jack yelled across the street to Miss. Maudie to come marry him.(43)

48

"...Jem and I edged down the sidewalk parallel to the side of the house. (48)

50

"Mr. Avery boarded across the street from Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose's house. (50)

50

"We leaped over the low wall that separated Miss Rachel's yard from our driveway. (50).

54

"We ran across the schoolyard, crawled under the fence to Deer's Pasture behind our house, climber our back fence and were at the back steps.(54)

63

"The [tree] on the corner of the Radley lot comin' from school" (63).

65

"Jem hopped across the front yard, when we were on the side walk in front of Miss Maudie's house Mr. Avery accosted us" (65).

71

"Jem and I slid across the street. Miss Maudie was staring at the smoking in her yard. 71

 

"Jem and I were leavin...He pointed across the street. At First we saw nothing but a kudzu-covered front porch, but a closer inspection revealed an arc of water descending from the leaves and splashing in the yellow circle of the street light, ...Jem said Mr. Avery misfired.

 

"Mrs. Dubose lived alone except for a Negro girl in constant attendance, two doors up the street from us in a house with steep front and a hot-dog hall.

 

"There he was returning to me. His white shirt bobbed over the back fence.

 

"They ran across the schoolyard, crawled under the fence to the Deer's Pasture behind their house, climbed the fence and were at the back steps of their house.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Continuation of Characterization Project

Review:

Essential Question: How are characters developed in a story?

Characterization: All the methods used to present the personality of a character in a work of literature.

Direct characterization- the writer tells the reader explicitly what kind of person the character is. Description.

Indirect characterization- The reader has to interpret information in order to ascertain a character's personality through:

·                     Things the character says or thinks

·                     Things the character does

·                     Things other characters think or say

·                     Things other characters do

·                     List the Major Characters in the novel:

·                     Aunt Alexandra

·                     Scout

·                     Dill

·                     Jem

·                     Calpurnia

·                     Atticus

·                     Miss Maudie

·                     Bob Ewell

·                     Dolphus Raymond

·                     Tom Robinson

·                     Mayella

·                     Judge Taylor

Minor Characters:

·                     Reverend Sykes

·                     Miss. Dubose

·                     Heck Tate

·                     Francis

·                     Mr. Underwood

·                     Mr. Cunningham

Comparing Two Characters Task:

·                     Choose a character and fill in examples of how the characters are created in the characterization chart.

·                     Break into groups to complete the chart and review your examples.

·                     Share your group example with your partner.

·                     Create an edited copy of your parner's character chart for yourself.

·                     Decide how you and your partner will create a graphic representation of a comparison of your two characters.

·                     Create your graphic comparison on a sheet of large paper and post it in the classroom.

·                     Write your responses to these questions on your worksheets and turn them in.

·                     Closure:

o                                            How are characters created in a novel?

o                                            How do you support your opinion of a character?

o                                            What steps in analyzing the characterization of the novel did you have to take before you could complete your final graphic comparison project?

Comparing a Character to Boo Task:

·                     Break into groups to choose a character and fill in examples of how the character is created in the characterization chart.

·                     Decide how you and your partner will create a graphic representation of a comparison of your character and Boo.

·                     Create your graphic comparison on a sheet of large paper and post it in the classroom.

·                     Your graphic should include:

o                                            Characteristics of each character with support,

o                                            An analysis of how the characters compare,

o                                            A graphic that represents an important idea or conclusion you reached.

·                     Write your responses to these questions on your worksheets and turn them in.

·                     Closure:

o                                            How are characters created in a novel?

o                                            How does a reader create and support an opinion of a character?

What steps in analyzing the characterization of the novel did you have to take before you could complete your final graphic comparison project?

Characterization Chart

Support: Quote and Page

Opinion: Summary and analysis

 

 

 

 

Roots of Racism LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

·                     How does right living depend on awareness, willingness and courage?

·                     How can prejudice and superstition lead to injustice?

·                     What happens when people fear what they do not understand?

·                     How does the most important part of a child’s education take place outside of the classroom?

·                     How do people tend to judge others by their own standards?

·                     What is the real meaning of courage?

·                     How is an individual influenced by the past?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will effects of nature and nurture on the individual and the connection to essential questions and themes.

Major Activity

Roots of Racism activity

Purpose

Analyze effects of nature and nurture on the individual.

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, notes, collaborative groups

 

 


 

 

Roots of Racism Tree Graphic Organizer Project

 

Copy the Essential Understanding and the lists onto a piece of paper.

Essential Understanding: Attitudes, beliefs, and prejudices can have their roots in the past.

List characters, places, and concepts from the novel:

CHARACTERS: Simon Finch, Aunt Alexandria, Atticus Finch, Uncle Jack, Francis, Scout, Jem, Miss Maudie, Calpurnia, Stephanie Crawford, Mr. Ewell, Mr. Cunningham,

PLACES: Deep South, Plantations, Finch's Landing, Boston, Montgomery, Maycomb,

CONCEPTS: Slavery, Racism

Task:

·          Form a group of three students.

·          Each student should work on their own sheet of paper.

·          Work with your group to:

Draw a tree that represents the racism in the novel, complete with roots, trunk, branches and leaves.

Discuss with your group where to locate the items from the list onto the parts of the tree.

Label the parts of the tree.

Write an explanation of your project and rationale.

Present your tree to the class.

Write presentation notes that include the following:

Group name

Project rationale and explanation

One positive idea or representation from the project

One suggestion or area for improvement

One thing out of place-and why

 



 

 

Eyes Project

Define:

Epiphany- sudden realization or breakthrough

Realization- a point of understanding

Character change- transition from child to adult

Perspective- seeing something from a point of view

Knowledge- intelligence, understanding

List people and events of novel so far:

Simon Finch, Aunt Alexandria, Atticus Finch, Uncle Jack, Francis, Scout, Jem, Miss Maudie, Calpurnia, Stephanie Crawford, Mr. Ewell, Mr. Cunningham, Mayella, Tom Robinson, Dolphus Raymond, Boo, Dill, Zeebo,

Turtle, dog, cake, fire, tree, death, pants, shots, illness, stabbing, school, trial,

Draw an eye.

Place the events and people on the eyelashes.

Write the realizations and epiphanies around the eye.

What does Scout realize as a result of the experiences and people she interacts with in the novel?

Closure: Write one page about how the character changes in the story. Describe what is happening to the character using as many character change words as you can and using the events of the novel as support.

Character Change Word Bank:

Epiphany

Understanding

Breakthrough

Realization

Knowledge and knowing

Seeing

Perspective

Point Of View

Transition from child to adult

Maturity and growing up

Coming of age

 

 


 

 

Assignment Sheet
Check off assignments handed in.
Record the grade received.

 

Chapter

Summary

Questions

Journal

Quiz

 

1

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

21

 

 

 

 

22

 

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

 

24

 

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

 

26

 

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

 

30

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter Summaries

Chapter One

·                     The setting is in 1933 during the depression in Maycomb County, Alabama

·                     Jem broke his arm when he was 12 (before flashback)

·                     Simon Finch established Finch's Landing with 3 slaves

·                     The dad is Atticus Finch, a lawyer

·                     Calpurnia is the cook

·                     Dill came to town

·                     Boo Radley gets in trouble with the Cunninghams and is locked up for 15 years

·                     Boo stabs his dad

·                     The kids believe that the Radley house is haunted

·                     Jem slaps Boo's house, the shutter flickers

Chapter Two

·                     Scout goes to school and gets in trouble for knowing how to read.

·                     Miss Caroline doesn't understand the ways of country children.

·                     Walter Cunningham is too poor to have lunch but won't accept a handout.

·                     Scout gets 'whipped'.

Chapter Three

·                     Scout beats up Walter, Jem invites him to lunch/dinner

·                     Scout gets in trouble for giving Walter grief about his table manners

·                     Little Chuck Little helps out Ms. Caroline

·                     Burris Ewell has lice, swears and leaves school

·                     Calpurnia treats Scout with affection

·                     Scout complains about Ms. Caroline but Atticus tells her to put herself into other people's skin

·                     Atticus and Scout make the deal to read and learn

Chapter Four

Continue writing chapter summaries on your own.

Chapter Five ...

 


 

A Cifferobe


 

 

 

 

 

 

To Kill A Mockingbird Theme Project

Brainstorm themes:

·                     Choose one aspect of the novel that is of interest to you and write one page about it.

·                     Share your idea with someone else and read his or her idea. Write a one-page response to what they have written.

·                     Decide on a way to present your idea as a project.

·                     Review the rubric and through discussion, research and reflection, develop a plan for your project that will meet all the requirements specified in the rubric.

·                     Turn in project with the rubric filled out as a self-assessment.

 

 

Final Individual Project Rubric

 

A

B

C

D-F

Evidence of support from the novel

Three support details with quotes and page numbers

Two

One

No evidence of support

Getting the point across

Very clear

Somewhat clear

Unclear

No Point

Explanation of how the project relates to the novel

Very clear

Somewhat clear

Unclear

None

Project reflects entire novel

Entire novel and its themes and messages

One theme or message

One scene, character, or event

Part of one scene, character, event

Presentation/ Appearance

Neat

Somewhat neat

Sloppy

A mess

Creativity

Very Creative

Somewhat creative

Not Creative

None

On time and completed

On time and Length and quality appear sufficient

Late and/or Appears to be thrown together

3 days late and/or Obviously too short or small

5 days late and/or less than one hour’s work

Evidence of Discussion/ research/ reflection

Used all class time to dialog with teacher and students or for research

Used some class time

Used little class time

Wasted all class time

 

 

 

 


 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird Video Journal

(Write one full page about the topic. Use these questions to help you write a complete page.)

Journal 1: Turning the novel into a movie.

How should the video begin?

How would you like for the producer to start the story?

What would be the best way to portray the book?

What should the producer be trying to do

What should the characters look like?

What should the setting look like?

 

Journal 2: Video Expectations.

Did the beginning of the video meet your expectations?

What did the producer do differently?

Can you guess why the producer treated the beginning this way?

What characters are the way you had envisioned them?

How do the characters fall short of your expectations?

How does the setting meet your expectations?

 

Journal 3: Symbols.

How well do you think the symbols were treated in the video?

What symbols did you notice?

What symbols were missing?

What should have been done symbolically that was not?

What symbols were unique to the video?

Consider the tire, watch, Radley house, gun, mockingbird, etc…

 

Journal 4: Themes.

How well is the video portraying the themes of the novel?

How well is it dealing with the main theme of racism?

How well is it dealing with the other themes represented by the statement "It’s a sin to kill a mockingbird’? "?

(gender bias, cultural bias, social norms, social class, reverse discrimination, innocence, corruption, respect, intolerance, perversion of religion, comparisons, the cycle of poverty, )

 

Journal 5: Plot.

How effective is the presentation of the plot?

How is what’s happening helping to advance the theme of the novel?

Were events missing that needed to be included?

How effectively were plot elements adapted from the novel to the video version?

 

Journal 6: Imagery and Shadows.

How does the producer’s use of shadows portray both perceived threat and real threat?

How does he use it to ‘foreshadow’ the ultimate corruption of innocence of the adult world?

 

Journal 7: Mob scene.

What do the men realize at the jail when Scout talks to Mr. Cunningham?

How does this scene help the reader/viewer to understand the themes of the novel?

 

Journal 8: Maintaining the status quo (the way things are)

Why does Mayella call on the white men who act so high-and-mighty to not be cowards?

What is she saying about the status of whites and blacks?

What is she demanding that they uphold?

What is worse to her than being the lowest piece of white trash imaginable?

 

Journal 9: Conflict.

How is Scout’s perception of the fight scene symbolic?

What does it say about her ability to know what is going on?

What does her smashed costume represent?

How does her recognition of Boo and her perspective from the porch symbolize her progression into the corrupt adult world with the compassion Atticus was trying to instill in her?

 

Journal 10: Denouement.

How does Sheriff Tate’s cover-up reconcile with the main themes of the novel?

What parallels can you draw between this action and the political process of affirmative action?

 

Journal 11: The SHS Mission Statement.

How does this unit support the SHS Mission?

Our mission is to provide a safe, academically rigorous, and culturally enriching environment that fosters intellectual, emotional, and ethical growth.

 


 

Homework: Read through chapter 11 and answer all questions and journals  by Friday.


 

 

 


 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird Video Questions and Notes

(Write complete sentences and express complete ideas).

1. (3:00) How did the movie begin?

2. (4:50) Why does Atticus tell Scout not to call him next time?

3. (5:30) Why do the Cunninghams pay their lawyer with nuts and greens?

4. (7:50) How well does Dill fit your expectations?

5. (10:10) How did Jem describe Boo?

6. (10:47) What did Boo do with the scissors?

7. (10:50) How does the video deal with Miss. Stephanie and Aunt Rachel?

8. (12:10) Who dares to say hello to Miss DeBose?

9. (13:05) How does Atticus disarm Miss. Debose?

10. (13:50) How does Atticus refer to the Radleys?

How is the way Scout reads inconsistent with the novel?

11. (15:05) Why does Scout want to see the watch?

12. (18:05) How does Atticus react to Judge Taylor's proposal?

13. (18:20) Why did Jem push Scout into the Radley yard?

14. (19:35) Why did Jem touch the Radley’s door?

15. (20:10) Why does Dill want to go to town?

16. (22:45) Why doesn't Atticus want the kids at the courthouse?

17. (22:50) What is Tom Robinson accused of?

18. (22:55) How would Bob Ewell have saved the taxpayers money?

19. (23:00) What does Bob Ewell realize when he says 'you have children of your own?'

20. (24:30) What are the children trying to do in the dark outside?

21. (31:10) Why did they run away?

22. (31:10) Why did Jem go back?

23. (31:55) What happened when he went back? (32.40) Who shot the gun and why?

24. (34:00) Why is Scout uncomfortable on her first day of school?

25. (36:17) Why did Jem invite Walter Cunningham to come home to lunch?

26. (38:00) Why is it a sin to kill mockingbirds?

27. (38:30) How did Scout embarrass Walter? (38:50) What does Calpurnia understand about having a guest in your house that Scout doesn’t understand?

28. (40:30) When Scout complains about school, how does Atticus explain about people's differences?

29. (44:30) How is it ironic that Atticus can shoot so well?

30. (45:00) Who does Atticus go to visit?

31. (47:13) Who comes to the car and scares the children? (47:30) Why isn’t Atticus afraid?

32. (49:00) What happens when Jem is alone after Atticus takes Calpurnia home? (49:30) What things might Jem be afraid of in the dark?

33. (51:00) What does Jem find, and where does he find it?

34. (51:56) Why does Scout fight with Cecil Jacobs and what does Atticus say about it?

35. (53:00) Why does Atticus feel he has to defend Tom Robinson and what is he trying to teach Scout?

36. (55:00) What did the two dolls look like?

37. (55:30) What did Boo’s father do to the tree?

38. (57:39) What other things does Jem show Scout that he found in the tree?

39. (58:00) What strange thing does Jem say happened to his britches the night he lost them and who does the narrator imply did it? (58:40) What does Jem say about his father and what do you think? (59:20) Why was Tom Robinson jailed in Abbottsville instead of Maycomb?

40. (1:03:00) Why does the sheriff need Atticus’ help? (101:50) Why does Jem go to see what his dad is doing at the jail?

41. (1:03:00) Why did the men go to the jail and who was with them? (103:47) What does Jem do that proves he is maturing into an honorable man?

42. (1:05:30) How do you explain why the men who came in to lynch Tom left?

43. (1:08:30) Where could the children find a seat at the trial?

44. (1:14:37) What was Mr. Ewell’s version of the story?

45. (1:15:23) Why did Atticus have Mr. Ewell write and what does it imply?

46. (1:17:10) What did Miss Mayella say that her dad asked when he got there?

47. (1:20:00) What was wrong with Tom’s hand and what does it imply?

48. (1:22:00) What did you think after Mayella testified? (122:05) What is she asking the jury to protect as “fine fancy gentlemen”?

49. (1:) What did you think after Tom testified?

50. (1:) What did Tom say that would have angered the whites in the jury?()What testimony could Mayella’s siblings have provided and would it be convincing?

(1:33:30)What has Atticus say about Mr. Ewell and what does it imply that he is guilty of?

51. (1:34:30) What was the offense that Atticus says Mayella is guilty of?

52. (1:36:30) What lie does Atticus say that society believes and how will they react to being told that this belief is a lie?

 

54. (1:) Why did all the blacks in the balcony stand when Atticus left?

55. (1:) What does Miss Maudie say to Jem?

56. (1:) What happened to Tom Robinson after the trial?

57. (1:47:00) Why did Tom run like a crazy man?

58. (1:47:00) Why did Tom Robinson try to escape?

59. (1:47:00) What happened to Tom Robinson? (1:48:30) Why did Jem insist on going with Atticus out to see Mrs. Robinson. (1:49:30) What woud someone do to Mr. Ewell if he showed up in the black neighborhood and said, “Boy” nowadays and why didn’t it happen in the movie? (1:50:50) Why didn’t Atticus react to Mr. Ewell. What was he showing Mr. Ewell?

60. (1:53:00) Why can’t Scout see too well while walking home from the pageant? (1:53:50) Who is following them?

61. (1:) What happened on the way home in the dark?

62. (1:) How did Jem get home and who helped him?

63. (1:) How did Bob Ewell end up with a kitchen knife in him and where did it come from?

64. (1:) What was Boo really like and what proof do you have?

65. (1:) Why would the author have Scout meet Boo instead of Jem?

66. (1:) Why won’t Jem go on trial?

67. (1:) Why won’t anyone go on trial and who decides?

68. (1:) What would it do to Boo and how would it affect him?

69. (1:) How is it ironic that Boo will not go on trial but Tom did?

70. (1:) What would be like shooting a mockingbird and why?

71. (1:) What did Scout see from the Radley porch?

72. (1:) What would Jem have seen from his character’s perspective?

 


 

 

Task: Write a 1-2 page typed critical essay about an important message of the novel other than the video’s message about racism.

Prompt: What is an important message of the novel that is different from the video’s main message about racism, and how is it supported by the events, images, symbols and other literary devices?

 

 

 

 

Other Links

http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/mocking/study.html

http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/Belmont_HS/tkm/

http://www.gradesaver.com/ClassicNotes/Titles/killmockingbird/

http://www.fsu.edu/~CandI/ENGLISH/webquests/mocking.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher Reflection

Students seem to enjoy this unit. The results of the chapter quizzes show that more students are actually reading the novel. The chapter questions assure that the students examined all the diverse topics of the novel and have the basic understanding of the plot details necessary for an effective examination of themes. The students are interested in the diverse topics available through the text, but some students, when challenged, fall back on the obvious and comfortable topic of racism. Students enjoy the student-centered projects. The projects show an understanding of the novel and its diverse topics.

 


 

 

To Kill a Mockingbird  Essay

Overview:

The famous painter Pablo Picasso once said, Art is a little lie that makes us see truth.” Many readers would insist that fictional literature illuminates the truth and the truth of a literary work lies in its theme.  In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird the author develops multiple themes to illustrate greater truths about life.  Students have read the novel and reflected on many of these themes in journal entries.

 

Task:

Choose one of the ideas and themes from the novel. Research the idea to find more information and historical context. In a short critical essay, discuss the “truth” or the point that the author is making by identifying one theme of To Kill a Mockingbird. How does the author develop one theme to illustrate some greater truth?  How does the theme apply to life at the time of writing the novel, and life in the modern world? How is the information from your research relevant to the theme?

 

Be sure to:

·          In your introduction, include a clearly defined thesis statement that addresses the issue of the theme you have chosen.  Your entire essay must work to support this thesis statement.   

·          Use at least one specific details from your research to support your thesis. Use specific references to the novel and your research to develop your analysis.

·          Create a Works Cited page using MLA format. Specify the title and author and page numbers of all support.

·          Demonstrate an awareness of your audience. 

·          Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner.

 

Grading:

 

Your essay will receive two separate grades using the SAT writing rubric and the 21 Century Skills rubric.

 

SAT Writing Rubric

SCORE CRITERIA

6

Outstanding

4

Competent

2

Seriously Limited

point of view

critical thinking

support

effectively and insightfully develops a point of view on the issue and demonstrates outstanding critical thinking, using clearly appropriate examples, reasons, and other evidence to support its position

develops a point of view on the issue and demonstrates competent critical thinking, using adequate examples, reasons, and other evidence to support its position

develops a point of view on the issue that is vague or seriously limited, and demonstrates weak critical thinking, providing inappropriate or insufficient examples, reasons, or other evidence to support its position

organization

focus

coherence

is well organized and clearly focused, demonstrating clear coherence and smooth progression of ideas

is generally organized and focused, demonstrating some coherence and progression of ideas

is poorly organized and/or focused, or demonstrates serious problems with coherence or progression of ideas

language

vocabulary/diction

exhibits skillful use of language, using a varied, accurate, and apt vocabulary/diction

exhibits adequate but inconsistent facility in the use of language, using generally appropriate vocabulary/diction

displays very little facility in the use of language, using very limited vocabulary/diction or incorrect word choice

sentence structure

demonstrates meaningful variety in sentence structure

demonstrates some variety in sentence structure

demonstrates frequent problems in sentence structure

grammar

usage

mechanics

is free of most errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics

has some errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics

contains errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics so serious that meaning is somewhat obscured


21st Century Skills Rubric

Use of Real-World Digital and Other Research Tools

4

Excellent

3

Proficient

2

Sufficient

1

Insufficient

·         demonstrates ability to access a variety of digital resources, electronic media, and technology tools.

·         critically and competently evaluates the accuracy or reliability of digital, electronic, and technology resources.

·         uses information accurately and creatively for the issue or problem at hand.

·         demonstrates an understanding of the ethical and legal issues related to proper citation of source material.

Always