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To Kill a Mockingbird
The Pearl
Edward Scissorhands
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I Never Sang for My Father
The Sandlot
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Home  ›  Departments & Staff  ›  Departments  ›  Language Arts  ›  Teacher Web Sites  ›  Stuart Whiteside  ›  Sophomore English  ›  The Sandlot

The Sandlot

 

The Sandlot Unit Plan

Subject: English

Course: English II

Grade:10

Level: 1, 2, H

Mr. Whiteside: Stratford Public Schools

Concept: Coming of Age in America

Projected Dates of Unit:
Marking Period 3, Weeks 7-10.

English Standards

Standard 1:  Reading and Responding

Overarching Idea:  Students read, comprehend and respond in individual, literal, critical and evaluative ways to literary, informational and persuasive texts in multimedia formats.

                    Guiding Question:  How do we understand what we read?

                                Component Statements:

1.1    Students use appropriate strategies before, during and after reading in order to construct meaning.

1.2    Students interpret, analyze and evaluate text in order to extend understanding and appreciation.

1.3    Students select and apply strategies to facilitate word recognition and develop vocabulary in order to comprehend text.

1.4    Students communicate with others to create interpretations of written, oral and visual texts.

 

Standard 2:  Exploring and Responding to Literature

Overarching Idea:  Students read and respond to classical and contemporary texts from many cultures and literary periods.

Guiding Question: How does literature enrich our lives?

Component Statements:

2.1    Students recognize how literary devices and conventions engage the reader.

2.2    Students explore multiple responses to literature.

2.3    Students recognize and appreciate that contemporary and classical literature has shaped human thought.

2.4    Students recognize that readers and authors are influenced by individual, social, cultural and historical contexts.

 

Standard 3: Communicating with Others

                Overarching Idea:  Students produce written, oral and visual texts to express, develop and substantiate ideas and experiences.

Guiding Question: How do we write, speak and present effectively?

Component Statements:

3.1    Students use descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive and poetic modes.

3.2    Students prepare, publish and/or present work appropriate to audience, purpose and task.

 

Standard 4: Applying English Language Conventions

Overarching Idea:  Students apply the conventions of standard English in oral, written and visual communication.

Guiding Question: How do we use the English language appropriately to speak and write?

Component Statements:

4.2    Students speak and write using standard language structures and diction appropriate to audience and task.

4.3    Students use standard English for composing and revising written text.

Sophomore ‘Powered’ and ‘Unwrapped’ English Standards

Standard

Verbs/Skills

Nouns/Knowledge

1.1   

use

reading strategies

1.1   

construct

meaning

1.2   

analyze

text

1.2   

extend

understanding

1.3

select

word recognition strategies

2.1   

recognize

literary devices

3.2   

prepare

work appropriate to audience, purpose and task

3.2   

publish

work appropriate to audience

4.1

improve

competency in English

4.2   

write

using standard language structures and diction

4.3

composing

written text

4.3

revising

written text

Additional Sophomore English Standards

Standard

Verbs/Skills

Nouns/Knowledge

1.2   

interpret

text

1.2   

evaluate

text

1.2   

extend

appreciation

1.3

apply

word recognition strategies

1.3

develop

vocabulary

1.3

comprehend

text

1.4

communicate

interpretations of  texts

1.4

create

interpretations of  texts

2.1   

recognize

conventions

2.2

explore

multiple responses to literature

2.3 

recognize

Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought

2.3 

appreciate

Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought

2.4   

recognize

social, cultural and historical influences

3.1

use

descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive modes

3.2   

present

work appropriate to audience

4.1

use

knowledge of their language and culture to

4.2   

speak

using standard language structures and diction

4.3

use

standard English for

Essential Understanding: (Copy into notes.)
Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text.

Essential Questions:

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

Topics: America, American, Fears, Opportunities, Growing up, Coming of age, Legends, Heroes, Role Models, Perspective, Family, Friendship, Appearances, Conformity, Acceptance, Fate, Responsibility, Reality and illusion, Duality of man, Self-awareness, Respect, Retribution, Justice, Guilt, Good and evil, Elements of literature, Literary devices, see Study Guide.

Process: Reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, responding, interpreting, analyzing, and discussion.

Skills: Active Viewing (Critical reading, critical thinking, using textual support), cooperative learning, vocabulary, note taking, journals, short answer, essay writing, creative writing.

Assessment (including homework): Assignments and Activities, Active Viewing Questions, Active Viewing Journals, Projects, Quizzes and tests.

Learning Activities:

·         Pre Viewing Discussion

·         View Video

·         Active Viewing Questions

·         Active Viewing Journal

·         Character Chart

·         Five Act Play Activity

·         Final Essay or Project

·         Projects

·        Group work.

I.E.P. Lesson Modifications: Preferential seating. Extended time. Computer access. Prior notice of tests and assignments. Alternate setting. Organizational help. Cue expected behavior. Positive reinforcement. Check for understanding. Check work. Provide models. Repeat instructions. Encourage participation. Graphic organizers. Use of agenda. Multiple modalities. Communication with resource and home. Also see individual IEPs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre Viewing Questions LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

Answer previewing questions

Purpose

Activate prior knowledge

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

 Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, questions

 

 

 

Pre-Viewing Discussion Starters

Essential Understanding:

Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes. Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text.

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

 

 

 

Character Chart LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

View text and complete character chart

Purpose

Cognition, Understanding, literary analysis

Parameters

5 minutes daily, adjusted as needed while viewing and pausing video

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, charts

 

 

 

Character Chart

Character

Textual Support

Interpretation of character

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Application of the Five Act Play Structure LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

Application of the Five Act Play Structure

Purpose

Cognition, Understanding, analysis

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed after viewing and pausing video

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, graphic organizer

 

 

 

Application of the Five Act Play Structure

Using your list of attributes and characteristics for each act, determine if the video fits the general structure of a five-act play and record where each act begins and ends.

Act

Characteristics.

Begins

Ends

Act I

exposition - introduction, background information

 

 

Act II

rising action - the events leading up to the climax, conflict

 

 

Act III

climax - the point of highest dramatic tension at which the rising action is reversed to the falling action

 

 

Act IV

falling action - action after the climax leading to the denouement

 

 

Act V

denouement or catastrophe--the final action that completes the unraveling of the plot (catastrophe)

 

 

 

 

 

Active Viewing Journal LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

View text and answer journal prompt questions

Purpose

Cognition, Understanding, extension

Parameters

10 minutes adjusted as needed daily before viewing and pausing video

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector,  journal prompts

 

 

 

Active Viewing Journal
Write complete responses in your journal, 10 points per day for one page. Extra credit of 10 points available for one extra page each day.

Journal 1: Legends/ Heroes/ Role Models.

·                     What is a Legend?

·                     Hero?

·                     Role Model?

Journal 2: Coming of Age.

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are some of the coming of age rituals in your culture?

·                     How does your perspective change as you come of age?

Journal 3: America.

·                     What does it mean to be American?

·                     What is America?

Journal 4: Fears and Opportunities.

·                     How can fears stop us?

·                     What does it take to make the most of opportunities?

Journal 5: Childhood Perceptions

·                     What things were exaggerated in the movie?

·                     What is the effect of these exaggerations?

·                     Do children exaggerate and why?

·                     Why do people remember things differently than they occurred?

·                     What are some of the themes that are supported by these exaggerations?

Final Journal Entry: How does this unit support the SHS Mission?

 

 

 

Active Viewing Questions LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

View text and answer questions

Purpose

Cognition, Understanding

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed while viewing and pausing video

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, questions

 

 

 

The Sandlot Active Viewing Questions

Pause the video for each question. Write answers in complete sentences on a separate piece of paper. Label, staple, grade 1 point per answer, and turn in. Extra credit of one extra point per question is available for each extra sentence written.

 

1.                    (2.00) What is the literary device that is used at the beginning of the movie?

2.                    (2:00) What is the legend of Babe Ruth?

3.                    (2.00) Who else becomes a legend?

4.                    (2.00) What were the names of the two teams written on the narrator’s scorecard?

5.                    (2:40) What is the effect of the sneaker on home plate and how is it symbolic?

6.                    (3:23) What major event happened the summer that he moved in, according to Scotty?

7.                    (3:47) Why doesn’t Smalls have any friends?

8.                    (3:54) What is Smalls' stepfather's name?

9.                    (4:30) What has Bill promised to do for Scott?

10.                 (4:59) What does Bill’s sports room symbolize?

11.                 (6:04) How is the game at the sandlot a dream game?

12.                 (6:29) What effect does Scotty saying, "If I had known, I never would have gone?" have on the tone of the video?

13.                 (6:54) How is suspense created about the mystery behind the outfield fence?

14.                 (8:18) Why do you think that Scotty can’t throw and catch?

15.                 (9:15) What does the Erector Set show about Scotty’s character?

16.                 (10.00) What is Mom worried about?

17.                 (10.05) How is "I’m not good at anything" ironic?

18.                 (10.15) Why does Scotty think he is just an egghead and what is an egghead?

19.                 (12.45) Why is Scotty having so much trouble catching?

20.                 (12.00) How is baseball a metaphor for Scotty?

21.                 (13.40) How is Bill’s advice to "Keep your eye on the ball," ironic?

22.                 (14.06) When Benny first invites Smalls to play baseball with him, what excuse does Smalls give him?

23.                 (14.40) What date is on the license plate?

24.                 (14.45) What is the Coca-Cola billboard symbolic of?

25.                 (15.35) What does Scotty reveal about his character when he asks "Who’s that?" about The Great Bambino?

26.                 (16.00) Who are all the characters?

27.                 (17.11) Who, according to Benny, runs like a duck?

28.                 (17.20) What did Squints call Smalls when Rodriguez brought him to the sandlot?

29.                 (17.22) What does Rodriguez mean by "You’re part of the game?"

30.                 (17.50) What position did Benny put Smalls at in the beginning of the game?

31.                 (24.10) What is DeNunez's famous pitch?

32.                 (20.25) How can "This is baseball; you got to stop thinking" apply to more than just the game?

33.                 (22.00) How believable is the first catch and throw scene?

34.                 (22.25) What effect does the shadow of the dog on the fence create?

35.                 (23.15) What was the only hat that Scotty owned?

36.                 (23.15) What is Rodriguez doing figuratively by giving Smalls his old hat?

37.                 (23.40) What letter(s) is/are on the pitcher Kenny Nunez's baseball cap?

38.                 (27.45) What did Smalls have to do before going to the campout?

39.                 (28.50) Who had to explain to Smalls what a s'more was?

40.                 (30.00) According to the story that Squints told about The Beast, where did he used to live?

41.                 (30.30) According to Squints, how do the police learn about what the Beast had been doing?

42.                 (30.00 What parts of the beast story are obviously exaggerated?

43.                 (31.40) How long did the beast have to be chained up?

44.                 (33.00) What proved the beast story to Smalls?

45.                 (34.00 53.25) Where do the boys buy their baseballs?

46.                 (34.10) Who smiled at Squints?

47.                 (36.00) Why did the boys go to the pool instead of playing baseball?

48.                 (36.40) Who was the lifeguard at the community swimming pool?

49.                 (40.00) Why did Squints almost drown in the pool?

50.                 (41.30) How long did the boys get banned from the pool?

51.                 (41.36) Why did Squints walk a little taller?

52.                 (42.15) What night of the year do they get to have their one and only night game?

53.                 (45.00) What song plays in the background of the boys' annual night game?

54.                 (46.30) When the opposing baseball team came to the sandlot, what was the biggest insult?

55.                 (46.31) What's the name of the team that challenged the kids?

56.                 (46.40) Who was the catcher at the game against the Tigers?

57.                 (51.00) What is the scene with the chewing tobacco representative of ?

58.                 (49.15) Who paid for the guys' tickets for the carnival rides?

59.                 (52.30) What song was playing while they were on the ride that they threw up on?

60.                 (53.20) How is Bill’s leaving Smalls as the man of the house representative of one of the themes of the novel?

61.                 (54.00) What is the thing that happened that seemed like an omen?

62.                 (54.00) Why does Smalls go home to get the ball and what ball does he get?

63.                 (54.00) What did Mom say about the ball that was like "salt on the wound"?

64.                 (1:03.31) What is Small’s idea to get the ball back?

65.                 (1:03.45) What do the images of the kite, doll, arrow prove about the junkyard and how is it a metaphor?

66.                 (1:04.58) What happens with the broomstick and is it believable? 

67.                 (1:00.00) What happens with the pan and is it believable?(1:06:03)

68.                 (1:08.28) What happens with the vacuums and is it believable? 

69.                 (1:06.03) What do these scenes say about childhood memories and perceptions?

70.                 (1:09.18) What does Timmy suggest?

71.                 (1:11.15) What happened to Yeah-Yeah?

72.                 (1:14.30) What does Smalls use?

73.                 (1:15.30) What does Babe Ruth say about legends?

74.                 (1:16.00) What does Babe Ruth tell Benny to do in his dream?

75.                 (1:00.00) How is Babe’s advice to "Just jump over there and get it." a metaphor for life?

76.                 (1:00.00) What does the Babe say that most people miss out on?

77.                 (1:00.00) When Babe Ruth appears to Benny in a dream, what does he take with him and why?

78.                 (1:19.00) What lesson did Benny take from The Babe?

79.                 (1:19.30) Why does Benny have to do it?

80.                 (1:22.34) What movie is playing in the movie theater and how is it symbolic?

81.                 (1:27.52) What is he doing symbolically by making friends with the beast?

82.                 (1:25.56) What have the kids done that allows them to play forever and how is it a metaphor for the reward for facing your fears?

83.                 (1:29.18) What was the name of the big dog that lived next to the sandlot and how is it ironic?

84.                 (1:31.44) What names were on the ball that Mr. Myrtle wanted to trade?

85.                 (1:32.30) What does Mr. Mertle mean by ‘crowd the plate’?

86.                 (1:33.00) What did he compare baseball to?

87.                 (1:33.00) What can the high fastball be a metaphor for?

88.                 (1:33.00) How was Mr. Mertle blinded?

89.                 (1:33.00) When Mr. Mertle gives Scotty the signed baseball, who signed it and what year was it signed?

90.                 (1:34.00) Who was the last kid to move away?

91.                 (1:34.27) What does Yeah-Yeah pioneer when he grows up and how is it ironic?

92.                 (1:34.36) What happens to Bertram and how is it ironic?

93.                 (1:34.48) What do Timmy and Tommy go on to and how is it ironic?

94.                 (1:34.58) What does Squints do and how is it ironic?

95.                 (1:35.04) What career does Ham go on to and what is his name?

96.                 (1:35.14) Why does DeNunez call his little league team the Heaters?

97.                 (1:35.23) How is the dog’s name ironic?

98.                 (1:36.30) What does Benny “The Jet” do at the end of the movie, playing for the Dodgers?

99.                 (1:36.50) What did Smalls do with the fishing hat that he wore the first day at the sandlot and why?

100.              (1:37.19) Who is the announcer and how do we know?

 

 

 

 

Soundtracks LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

Listen to soundtracks

Purpose

synthesis

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed while listening to soundtracks

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, soundtrack

 

 

 

Soundtracks

"The Lion Sleeps Tonight"

Original Music and Lyrics by Solomon Linda

Performed by The Tokens

"This Magic Moment"

Performed by The Drifters

"Tequila"

Performed by The Champs

"America the Beautiful"

Performed by Ray Charles

"Smoky, Part 2"

Performed by Bill Black's Combo

"Wipe Out"

Performed by The Surfaris

"There Goes My Baby"

Performed by The Drifters

"Green Onions"

Performed by Booker T and the MG's

 

 

 

Text Interpretation and Analysis Project LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

Text Interpretation and Analysis Project

Purpose

closure

Parameters

Independent study

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, questions, journals, Text Interpretation and Analysis Project

 

 

 

The Sandlot Text Interpretation and Analysis Project

Write an essay in which you interpret one of the scenes or quotes and show its relevance to the plot, the conflict, and the theme.

Essay A: The Sandlot uses many literary devices to shape the work and help support the themes. Write a well-developed essay that explains how a theme of the video was developed through the use of literary devices such as symbols, characters, imagery, metaphors etc.

Essay B: In a fully developed critical essay, interpret an important scene, or quote from the video and explain its relevance to the work as a whole. Write a critical essay that supports a thesis statement in which you make a conclusion about the meaning of your selection and its relation to the meaning of the video as a whole.

Guidelines:

Be sure to

·                     Create a purpose and clearly define it. Include a thesis statement in your introduction.

·                     Describe the meaning of your passage and of the entire video.

·                     Avoid plot summary. Instead use specific references to the work to develop your analysis.

·                     Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner.

·                     Specify the quotes and examples with scene names whenever possible.

·                     Demonstrate an awareness of your audience.

Suggested Structure

·                     Introduction: Develop a thesis that addresses the task.

·                     Body: Examine the details used to support your thesis. Every chosen detail (of plot, dialogue, characterization, setting, and the like) should support your essay’s thesis. Be sure to examine the relationship between the selection and the entire video.

·                     Conclusion: Revisit your thesis without restating it. Demonstrate progression from the beginning of your piece to the end. Return to a general view after analyzing specifics in the body of your essay.

 

 

 

The Sandlot SAT Essay LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

The Sandlot SAT Essay

 

Purpose

closure

Parameters

Independent study

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, questions, journals, The Sandlot SAT Essay

 

 

 

 

The Sandlot SAT Essay

The essay component asks students to write in response to an essay assignment, or prompt. These prompts are carefully selected to enable students to react and respond quickly in a variety of ways. They are written to be easily accessible to the general test-taking population, including students for whom English is a second language (ESL), and will be free of figurative, technical, or specific literary references. The prompt gives students the opportunity to use a broad range of experiences, learning, and ideas to support their points of view on the issue addressed. Because the prompt requires students to address a specific issue, students will not be able to prepare an essay in advance that will effectively address the essay assignment. The prompt can consist of a quotation or a short paragraph from some authentic text and an assignment question.

The essay measures your ability to:

·                     develop a point of view on an issue presented in an excerpt

·                     support your point of view using reasoning and examples from your reading, studies, experience, or observations

·                     follow the conventions of standard written English

The essay will be scored by trained high school and college teachers. Each reader will give the essay a score from 1 to 6 (6 is the highest score) based on the overall quality of the essay and your demonstration of writing competence. For more information, see the SAT Essay Rubric.

Directions

The essay gives you an opportunity to show how effectively you can develop and express ideas. You should, therefore, take care to develop your point of view, present your ideas logically and clearly, and use language precisely.

Your essay must be written on the lines provided on your answer sheet-you will receive no other paper on which to write. You will have enough space if you write on every line, avoid wide margins, and keep your handwriting to a reasonable size. Remember that people who are not familiar with your handwriting will read what you write. Try to write or print so that what you are writing is legible to those readers.

Important Reminders:

·                     A pencil is required for the essay. An essay written in ink will receive a score of zero.

·                     Do not write your essay in your test book. You will receive credit only for what you write on your answer sheet.

·                     An off-topic essay will receive a score of zero.

·                     You have twenty-five minutes to write an essay on the topic assigned below.

Essay Prompt Directions: Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment.

Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

Quotes

Benny: "Man, this is baseball. You gotta stop thinking. Just have fun. I mean, if you were having fun you would've caught that ball."

Assignment: Does trying hard bring success in life, or should you relax and enjoy life as it comes?

The Babe: "Remember kid, there's heroes and there's legends. Heroes get remembered but legends never die, follow your heart kid, and you'll never go wrong."

Assignment: How are heroes and legends created?

The Babe: "Let me tell you something kid; Everybody gets one chance to do something great. Most people never take the chance, either because they're too scared, or they don't recognize it when it spits on their shoes."

Assignment: Do people get opportiunities to do something great in their lives or do they have to make their own opportunities?

Narrator: "We all lived in the neighborhood for a couple of more years-mostly through junior high school-and every summer was great. But none of them ever came close to that first one. When one guy would move away, we never replaced him on the team with anyone else. We just kept the game going like he was still there. "

Assignment: How can memories be protected? Can new experiences live up to the standards of the past? ?

Mr. Mertle: "Baseball was life! And I was good at it... real good."

Assignment: How can people be good at life?

Squints: "... after a while the cops started getting calls from people reporting all the missing thieves..."

Assignment: How does childhood imagination affect reality? How do childhood perceptions change the way people see the world?

Squints: "The beast killed 120...143 guys!"

Assignment: How does childhood imagination affect reality?

How do people exaggerate to create myths?

 

 

 

Active Viewing Questions LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

View text and answer questions

Purpose

Cognition, Understanding

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed while viewing and pausing video

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, questions, journals

 

 

 

The Sandlot Theme Essay

 

There are many themes in the movie The Sandlot. The movie could be about coming of age, childhood perceptions, fears and opportunities, exaggeration, America and American culture, heroes, legends and role models.

 

·        Task-Write a well developed essay that explains the theme of the video.

 

·        Essay Question: What is the theme of the video and how is the message gotten across to the viewer?

 

·        Planning Stage

·        Write a thesis statement in which you clearly answer the essay question or complete the task.

·        Write topic sentence outline. Write a sentence that clearly states the topic of each paragraph.

·        topic of body paragraph:

·        topic of body paragraph:

·        topic of body paragraph:

 

·        Writing Stage

·        Write an Introduction

·        Hook (one sentence)

·        Background Information (2-3 sentences about the book, author, characters or themes)

·        Thesis (a statement that clearly answers the essay question)

·        Write the body paragraphs

·        Begin with Topic Sentences from your outline

·        Add details that all relate to this sentence.

·        Write the detail into the paragraph in a way that reads smoothly.

·        Write a sentence that serves as a conclusion.

·        Write a conclusion paragraph

·        Be sure you restate your thesis in some way.

·        You may restate some of what you have already said in new ways.

·        Do not bring any new information into the conclusion.

 

° Publication Stage

°         Type the essay double-spaced 12 point Times New Roman

°         Include your name, date, and assignment in upper left

° Include your last name and page number at right of header.

 

 

 

Active Viewing Questions LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions:

·                     What makes up America and what it means to be American?

·                     What effect can fears have on life?

·                     How can opportunities be missed or taken advantage of?

·                     What is coming of age?

·                     What are legends and heroes?

·                     What is a role model?

·                     How important is 'perspective' on the reality we experience?

·                     How do feelings affect our perceptions?

·                     How important is it to fit in?

·                     How important is a sense of right and wrong?

·                     Is it necessary to conform to society?

·                     What does it take to belong?

·                     Does society appreciate diversity?

·                     What is active viewing?

·                     What is the benefit of pausing the video?

·                     How can students construct meaning from the text?

·                     Proficient viewers exhibit certain qualities and use certain strategies in developing proficiency. 

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas

·                      Video, just like written texts, can be analyzed to discover how the author uses literary devices to help support the themes

·                      Active viewing involves a heightened sense of intellectual awareness of and interaction with video in a way that is similar to reading and interpreting text..

Major Activity

View text and answer questions

Purpose

Cognition, Understanding

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed while viewing and pausing video

 

Resources

The Sandlot, Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, questions, journals

 

 

 

Quotes

Benny: "Man, this is baseball. You gotta stop thinking. Just have fun. I mean, if you were having fun you would've caught that ball."

The Babe: "Remember kid, there's heroes and there's legends. Heroes get remembered but legends never die, follow your heart kid, and you'll never go wrong."

The Babe: "Let me tell you something kid; Everybody gets one chance to do something great. Most people never take the chance, either because they're too scared, or they don't recognize it when it spits on their shoes."

Narrator: "We all lived in the neighborhood for a couple of more years-mostly through junior high school-and every summer was great. But none of them ever came close to that first one. When one guy would move away, we never replaced him on the team with anyone else. We just kept the game going like he was still there. "

Mr. Mertle: "Baseball was life! And I was good at it... real good."

Squints: "... after a while the cops started getting calls from people reporting all the missing thieves..."

Squints: "The beast killed 120...143 guys!"

 

 

 

 

SCORE

2

4

6

CRITERIA

Seriously Limited

Competent

Outstanding

· point of view

· critical thinking

· support

develops a point of view on the issue that is vague or seriously limited, and demonstrates weak critical thinking, providing inappropriate or insufficient examples, reasons, or other evidence to support its position

develops a point of view on the issue and demonstrates competent critical thinking, using adequate examples, reasons, and other evidence to support its position

effectively and insightfully develops a point of view on the issue and demonstrates outstanding critical thinking, using clearly appropriate examples, reasons, and other evidence to support its position

· organization

· focus

· coherence

is poorly organized and/or focused, or demonstrates serious problems with coherence or progression of ideas

is generally organized and focused, demonstrating some coherence and progression of ideas

is well organized and clearly focused, demonstrating clear coherence and smooth progression of ideas

· language

· vocabulary

displays very little facility in the use of language, using very limited vocabulary or incorrect word choice

exhibits adequate but inconsistent facility in the use of language, using generally appropriate vocabulary

exhibits skillful use of language, using a varied, accurate, and apt vocabulary

· sentence structure

demonstrates frequent problems in sentence structure

demonstrates some variety in sentence structure

demonstrates meaningful variety in sentence structure

· grammar

· usage

· mechanics

contains errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics so serious that meaning is somewhat obscured

has some errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics

is free of most errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics