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Home  ›  Departments & Staff  ›  Departments  ›  Language Arts  ›  Teacher Web Sites  ›  Stuart Whiteside  ›  Sophomore English  ›  CAPT Literature

CAPT Literature

 

CAPT Response to Literature UbD Unit Plan
Jump to current
Subject: English
Course: English II
Grade: 10
Level: 1, 2, H
Stratford Public Schools: Mr. Whiteside
Concept: CAPT Response to Literature
Projected Dates of Unit: MP3, Week 1-5
Standard 1: Reading and Responding
Overarching Idea: Students read, comprehend and respond in individual, literal, critical and evaluative ways to literary, informational and persuasive texts in multimedia formats.
Guiding Question: How do we understand what we read?
Component Statements:
1.1 Students use appropriate strategies before, during and after reading in order to construct meaning.
1.2 Students interpret, analyze and evaluate text in order to extend understanding and appreciation.
1.3 Students select and apply strategies to facilitate word recognition and develop vocabulary in order to comprehend text.
1.4 Students communicate with others to create interpretations of written, oral and visual texts.
Standard 2: Exploring and Responding to Literature
Overarching Idea: Students read and respond to classical and contemporary texts from many cultures and literary periods.
Guiding Question: How does literature enrich our lives?
Component Statements:
2.1 Students recognize how literary devices and conventions engage the reader.
2.2 Students explore multiple responses to literature.
2.3 Students recognize and appreciate that contemporary and classical literature has shaped human thought.
2.4 Students recognize that readers and authors are influenced by individual, social, cultural and historical contexts.
Standard 3: Communicating with Others
Overarching Idea: Students produce written, oral and visual texts to express, develop and substantiate ideas and experiences.
Guiding Question: How do we write, speak and present effectively?
Component Statements:
3.1 Students use descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive and poetic modes.
3.2 Students prepare, publish and/or present work appropriate to audience, purpose and task.
Standard 4: Applying English Language Conventions
Overarching Idea: Students apply the conventions of standard English in oral, written and visual communication.
Guiding Question: How do we use the English language appropriately to speak and write?
Component Statements:
4.1 Students use knowledge of their language and culture to improve competency in English.
4.2 Students speak and write using standard language structures and diction appropriate to audience and task.
4.3 Students use standard English for composing and revising written text.
District and Content Standards
ENGLISH / LANGUAGE ARTS / READING
1. Students read, write, speak, listen, and view to construct meaning of written, visual, and oral text.
2. Students choose and apply appropriate strategies that facilitate the development of fluent and proficient use of the language arts including the use of technology.
3. Students use language in visual, oral, written, and performance-based forums.
4. Students write in the four modes of discourse (description, narration, exposition, and persuasion) for various purposes and audiences.
5. Students examine, understand, and respond to a variety of literature from diverse cultures and historical periods.
6. Students employ processes that encourage them in becoming independent, life-long learners in English Language Arts.
Powered and Unwrapped Standards for The Crucible Politics of Change Unit
Standard
Verbs/Skills
Nouns/Knowledge
1.1
use
reading strategies
1.1
construct
meaning
1.2
interpret
Text
1.2
analyze
text
1.2
evaluate
text
1.2
extend
understanding
1.2
extend
appreciation
1.3
select
word recognition strategies
1.3
apply
word recognition strategies
1.3
develop
vocabulary
1.3
comprehend
text
1.4
communicate
interpretations of texts
1.4
create
interpretations of texts
2.1
recognize
literary devices
2.1
recognize
conventions
2.2
explore
multiple responses to literature
2.3
recognize
Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought
2.3
appreciate
Influence of contemporary and classical literature on human thought
2.4
recognize
social, cultural and historical influences
3.1
use
descriptive, narrative, expository, persuasive and poetic modes
3.2
prepare
work appropriate to audience, purpose and task
3.2
publish
work appropriate to audience
3.2
present
work appropriate to audience
4.1
use
knowledge of their language and culture to
4.1
improve
competency in English
4.2
speak
using standard language structures and diction
4.2
write
using standard language structures and diction
4.3
use
standard English for
4.3
composing
written text
4.3
revising
written text
CAPT Response to Literature Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas:
 
The CAPT Response to Literature test uses Reader Response Theory to assess students' ability to read, comprehend and engage in critical thinking in the four dimensions of Understanding, Interpretation, Stance, and Connections.
 
Essential Questions:
In what ways is the CAPT important?
What does the CAPT measure?
What is Holistic Scoring?
What is the scoring rubric and how is it applied?
What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?
What is Initial Understanding?
What is Interpretation?
What is Critical Stance?
What are Connections?
How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?
How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?
How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?
What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?
·                                  
Additional Questions:
·                                 Does the protagonist have to win in order to be considered successful?
·                                 In understanding himself or herself, is the protagonist self-reliant or does he or she look to society for answers?
·                                 Have writers embraced or challenged the literary traditions established by literature of the western world in the so-called "classics"?
·                                 How does the community influence the values and beliefs of the individual?
·                                 How do relationships between characters develop the major themes of the text?
·                                 What are the contrasts between dreams and realities?  
Topics: Reader Response, Holistic Scoring, Rubrics, Literary Devices such as: Flashback, Plot, Conflict, Minor characters, Tragic Hero, Fatal Flaw, Elements of literature, Themes such as :Appearances, Power, Guilt, Fate, Responsibility, Ambition, Disillusionment, Duality of man, Self-awareness, Respect, Retribution, Justice, Loyalty, Love, Supernatural, Fate, Fatalism, Historical Accuracy, Responsibility, and Reading strategies.
Process: Reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, responding, interpreting, analyzing, discussion.
Skills: Use reading strategies, construct meaning, interpret text, analyze text, evaluate text, extend understanding, extend appreciation, recognize literary devices, recognize conventions, recognize social, cultural and historical influences, prepare work appropriate to audience, purpose and task, publish work appropriate to audience, present work appropriate to audience, speak using standard language structures and diction, write using standard language structures and diction..
Assessment: CAPT Response to Literature Rubric, Tasks, Assignments and Activities, Projects, Quizzes and tests.
I.E.P. Lesson Modifications: Preferential seating. Extended time. Computer access. Prior notice of tests and assignments. Alternate setting. Organizational help. Cue expected behavior. Positive reinforcement. Check for understanding. Check work. Provide models. Repeat instructions. Encourage participation. Graphic organizers. Use of agenda. Repeat instructions. Multiple modalities. Communication with resource and home. See Study Guide and individual IEPs.
Engaging Scenario:
 
Learning Activities/Tasks:
In Class
Homework
Read "A Hundred Bucks of Happy"
4 Questions
Review Midterm test, questions, and annotating story.
 Retell story, plot summary
Reread story, adding annotations.
 Complete annotations
 
Answer story questions
CAPT Response to Literature Unit Notes.
Write four paragraphs (one page) defining the four dimensions.
Review themes and devices.
 
Marker Paper Themes & Devices Analysis
 
 
Rewrite 4 CAPT responses of one page each with the target # of devices and themes.
Midterm Improvement Tips
 
 
 
Review UISC scoring
 
Response to Literature Rubric
 
Quick Reference C.A.P.T SCORING RUBRIC
 
Create CAPT Scoring Notecard
 
The Four Dimensions of Reader Response Theory Group Project
 
Graph all response scores. CAPT Bar Graph
 
CAPT Interpretation Project (To Kill a Mockingbird).
 
CAPT Connections
 
Know/Think chart to illustrate how to achieve the best CAPT score
 
Questions that may appear on the CAPT Response to Literature test
 
CAPT Response to Literature Tricks
 
CAPT question #1-4 Trick classwork and homework
 
CAPT Review
 
Read "What I Want to be When I Grow Up".
Write 4 CAPT one page responses
Read "What I Want to be When I Grow Up"
Essential Questions
CAPT packet
 
 
 
 


 

M

Clean out binders

Check binders

Collect work folder

Return and review exams

Review semester

Collect books

CAPT prep

Check CAPT portfolios

               Cover sheet

               Essays

               Exam essays

               Benchmark essays

               Summer Reading

Review semester.

Prepare for new marking period.

Organize students.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

 

45 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

T

CAPT Enduring Understandings

6 Midterm Improvement Tips
CAPT Response to Literature Unit Notes

Review Midterm, questions, and annotating story.

 

HW: Review Midterm

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

10 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

W

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Notes

Review UISC

 

HW: 4 dimension paragraphs

Write four paragraphs (one page) defining the four dimensions.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

Th

Collect HW

Review UISC scoring

Create CAPT Scoring Notecard
Response to Literature Rubric
                                     
HW: edit rubric

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

F

Review rubric
Quick Reference C.A.P.T SCORING RUBRIC
The Four Dimensions of Reader Response Theory Group Project

Write 4 Questions

 

HW: 4 dimension questions

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

M

Review Quick Reference C.A.P.T SCORING RUBRIC
Complete Four Dimensions of Reader Response Theory Group Project
Write 4 Questions
 
HW: 1 dimension question

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

T

Review Four Dimensions of Reader Response Theory Group Project
Share examples
Review rubric
Reread Amanda and the Wounded Birds
Annotations
 
HW: 4 dimension questions

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

10 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

W

Collect HW-Generic Dimension Responses
Review dimensions
Label dimensions-page 1
Reread Amanda and the Wounded Birds
Annotations
 
HW: Annotations

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process, rubric, questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To develop reading, thinking and annotating CAPT skills.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

Th

Label dimensions-page 1-3
Reread Amanda and the Wounded Birds
Annotations
Review themes and devices.
Make a list  of support for each dimension
 
HW: Rewrite CAPT response of one page each with the target # of devices and themes.
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

F

Review: Amanda and the Wounded Birds
Review themes and devices and lists of support for each dimension
Read responses
Avoid retelling story, plot summary
Notes from CAPT RtL workshop
CAPT Response to Literature Tricks
 
HW: Rewrite CAPT responses of one page each with the target # of devices and themes.
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

M

2/6

Collect: Amanda and the Wounded Birds
Annotations
responses
Notes from CAPT RtL workshop
CAPT Response to Literature Tricks
 
HW: Rewrite CAPT responses of one page each with the target # of devices and themes.
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

T

Reread Hundred Bucks of Happy
Annotations
 
HW: label dimensions

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

10 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

W

Reread Hundred Bucks of Happy
Annotations
UISC chart
Make a list  of support for each dimension
 
HW: dimensions support

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process, rubric, questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To develop reading, thinking and annotating CAPT skills.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

Th

Reread Hundred Bucks of Happy
Annotations
Review themes and devices.
 
HW: Rewrite CAPT response of one page each with the target # of devices and themes.

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

F

Progress check
Review:
Hundred Bucks of Happy
themes and devices
lists of support for each dimension
responses
Avoid retelling story, plot summary
CAPT Response to Literature Tricks
Independent Reading (CAPT)
 
HW: Find Independent Reading Book

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To establish CAPT connections with literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

M

2/13

Independent Reading (CAPT)
Read "What I Want" adding annotations.
CAPT Response to Literature Tricks
 
HW: Read "What I Want" adding annotations label dimensions
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

T

Independent Reading (CAPT)
 

To facilitate connections between independent reading and CAPT responses.

10 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

W

Review CAPT questions
Answer  "What I Want" questions.
 
HW: Make a list  of support for each dimension.
Rewrite CAPT response of one page each with the target # of devices and themes.
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process, rubric, questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To develop reading, thinking and annotating CAPT skills.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

Th

Answer  "What I Want" questions.
Review 4 CAPT questions
Check 4 evidence charts
Rewrite CAPT response of one page each with the target # of devices and themes.
 
HW: Write 4 CAPT responses
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

F

Independent Reading (CAPT)
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To establish CAPT connections with literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

M

2/27

CAPT Practice week
Independent Reading (CAPT)
DOL
Collect "What I Want" annotations, questions,
Rfi
CAPT Response to Literature Tricks
 
HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

T

CAPT Practice week
Independent Reading (CAPT)
DOL E&R practice
Collect
   "What I Want" annotations
   35 questions
   4 responses
Rfi
 
HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

10 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

W

CAPT Practice week
Independent Reading (CAPT)
DOL E&R practice
Collect
   "What I Want" annotations
   35 questions
   4 responses
Rfi “Video Games”
 
HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process, rubric, questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To develop reading, thinking and annotating CAPT skills.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

Th

CAPT Practice week
Independent Reading (CAPT)
CAPT practice booklet
 
E&R, Rfi practice
 
HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

F

CAPT Practice week
Independent Reading (CAPT)
Grade check
E&R, Rfi practice
 
HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To establish CAPT connections with literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories


 

SOPHOMORE ENGLISH  LESSON PLAN

 

M

3/5

CAPT week
Independent Reading (CAPT)
Collect "What I Want" annotations, questions,
CAPT Response to Literature Tricks

 

HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading
 

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

T

CAPT week
Independent Reading (CAPT)

 

HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

10 min

10 min

15 min

10 min

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

W

CAPT Practice week
Independent Reading (CAPT)

 

HW: Make-up "What I Want", independent reading

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process, rubric, questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To develop reading, thinking and annotating CAPT skills.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

Th

Edward Scissorhands Active Viewing
Journal
Questions

 

HW: Active viewing

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

F

Edward Scissorhands Active Viewing
Journal
Questions

 

HW: Active viewing

To prepare students for CAPT responses.

To familiarize students with CAPT scoring process.

To familiarize students with CAPT rubric.

To familiarize students with CAPT questions.

To improve assessments.

To discuss importance of elements of literature, theme, and plot.

To establish CAPT connections with literature.

25 min

10 min

10 min

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Plan, vocabulary, D.O.L., student collaboration, Warriner’s, short stories

 


 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

Enduring Understandings LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will read and copy enduring understandings and essential questions

Major Activity

Copy Essential Questions

Purpose

Exposure to Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 

 


 

 

Close Reading LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will read and annotate story

Major Activity

Close Reading of short story

Purpose

Application of Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, short story, class discussion

 


 

 

"A Hundred Bucks of Happy" Essential Questions
1.                                What is the literary effect of calling the thing found on Maple and Grove streets 'it' and is it a conscious choice by the author?
2.                                What do we learn about the main character from getting "lost in thought' and missing the turn?
3.                                What is the effect of the bill "glistening in the sunlight"?
4.                                How could "happy to have it" be a reference to thematic implications of the title?
5.                                What is the effect on the reader of using the words "exciting and wrong"?
6.                                Why was the main character "half running"?
7.                                How could the "been left to me by some munificent great aunt" be an indication of a theme about inheritance?
8.                                How is "hole in my pocket" a metaphor?
9.                                When the character "found what I was looking for" what was it and how is it ironic later on?
10.                             How do you react to the descriptions, "ran like the devil...fingers shook...dropped my schoolbooks"?

 

 


 

 

4 Marker Paper Themes & Devices Analysis LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will study rubric and score marker papers

Major Activity

4 Marker Paper Themes & Devices Analysis

Purpose

Exposure to marker papers and scoring

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 
 


 

 

4 Marker Paper Themes & Devices Analysis
Model counting the references to themes and devices on one marker paper.
Students create a chart and record the number of themes and devices.
Hand out marker papers with key numbers at top.
Count the references to themes and devices on each.
Complete the chart.
Discuss the number of themes and devices at each CAPT Score level.
Rewrite student mid-term responses to incorporate themes and devices.
 
 
Themes/Devices
CAPT Score 1-6
1
A
0-3
1
1
B
0-1
 
1
C
0-1
 
1
D
0-1
 
3
A
2-3
2
3
B
2-3
 
3
C
2-4
 
3
D
1-2
 
5
A
3-5
3
5
B
3-6
 
5
C
3-4
 
5
D
3-6
 
6
A
6
4
6
B
3-6
 
6
C
2-7
 
6
D
1-3
 
9
A
4-6
5
9
B
4-5
 
9
C
2-9
 
9
D
2-7
 
11
A
5-14
6
11
B
6-10
 
11
C
7-12
 
11
D
6-10
 

 

 


 

 

6 Midterm Improvement Tips LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

 

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will read, discuss and copy midterm tips

Major Activity

Copy improvement tips

Purpose

Increase CAPT performance

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 
 


 

 

6 Midterm Improvement Tips
·                                 Write only quote letter (save room for themes and devices)
·                                 Use small parts of quote in answer (each one counts as a theme or device)
·                                 Write "Maybe...." to help you feel free to guess at themes and devices.
·                                 Write "I think...." to help you feel free to guess at themes and devices.
·                                 Do not retell the plot of the story. (You use up room and get no credit for themes and devices)
·                                 Quote an example and give an interpretation (Quote & Point)
·                                 Don't admit ignorance.

 
 


 

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Notes LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will read and copy CAPT Response to Literature Unit Notes

Major Activity

Copy CAPT Response to Literature Unit Notes

Purpose

Notes and discussion of  Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 

 


 

 

CAPT Response to Literature Unit Notes
Holistic Scoring
·                                 Overall impression of the student's work
·                                 A Single score given
·                                 Balanced approach to scoring
·                                 Matched to anchor papers
·                                 Focuses on what’s RIGHT
·                                 Does not just take off credit for what’s WRONG
·                                 MORE is not necessarily BETTER
 Focuses on the Quantity and Quality of
o                                                        IDEAS and their
o                                                        DEVELOPMENT and
o                                                        ORGANIZATION
The state uses a technique called
Focused Holistic Scoring
-Focuses on four major DIMENSIONS
 
Response to Literature Four Dimensions (P1)
·                                 U - Initial Understanding
·                                 I - Developing an Interpretation
·                                 C - Connection
·                                 S - Critical Stance
Initial Understanding
Evidence of a general understanding of the text
·                                 Basic understanding
·                                 Important elements (characters, actions, or events) understood
·                                 Inconsistencies or ambiguities recognized and dealt with
 
DEVELOPING AN INTERPRETATION
·                                 Evidence of:
o                                                        Reflection upon and interaction with the text
o                                                        A search for deeper interpretations of the text
o                                                        Going beyond to search for overall meaning-theme
·                                 Clues or evidence from the text used to make inferences, draw conclusions
·                                 Initial understandings revised, replaced, and or deepened
·                                 Emotional or intellectual engagement with the text shown
 
CONNECTION
- Show Evidence of making associations between the themes of the text and life outside of the text
·                                 Make associations between the text and other texts, outside experiences, and/or other aspects of the student’s culture?
·                                 Apply understanding of people and make analogies between the world and the text?
Make associations between the characters’ lives and the student’s own life?
 
Critical Stance
-Evidence of stepping outside the text, challenging the text, and/or making judgments of quality about parts of the text as a whole.
·                                 Artistic appreciation of the text, sensitivity to the author’s style, and/or awareness of linguistic (word choice) or literary features shown
·                                 Challenge the text by disagreeing with or questioning the author
·                                 Examine the fit between the text and prior knowledge or experience and reconcile any differences between the two
·                                  Judge literary quality?
 
·                                  
Write a one paragraph description of each dimension (4 paragraphs total)

 

 

 


 

 

Dimension Review Project LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will show knowledge of essential questions

Major Activity

Dimension Review Project

Purpose

Assess essential understandings

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 

 


 

 

Dimension Review Project
Write a paragraph about each dimension of the reader response holistic scoring. Be sure to include:
·                                 definition
·                                 what the scorer will look for
·                                 what you could include in your response
·                                 what will earn a good score

 

 


 

 

 

Focused Holistic Scoring Note card LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will analyze the CAPT rubric and create a Focused Holistic Scoring Note card

Major Activity

Focused Holistic Scoring Note card

Purpose

Apply  Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings to CAPT questions

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 

 

 


 

 

Focused Holistic Scoring Note Card
U
UNDERSTANDING: Plot, Conflict, Events, Actions, Characters, Setting.
(Ask questions and comment on the plot and characters.)
I
INTERPRETATION: Theme, Message, Meaning, Moral.
(Reflecting, thinking, reacting to the message of the story.)
C
CONNECTION: Associations, Comparisons, Similarities.
(Compare the themes and conflicts to To Kill a Mockingbird or life, movies, stories, etc...)
S
STANCE: Judgments of Style, Literary Devices, Quality.
(Make judgments about why the story is good.)

 


 

 

Remember,
Holistic Scoring Focuses on the
Quantity and Quality
of IDEAS and their DEVELOPMENT and ORGANIZATION

 

 


 

 

CAPT Rubric LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will analyze the CAPT rubric and create an abbreviated rubric

Major Activity

Analyze CAPT rubric. Create  abbreviated CAPT rubric

Purpose

Apply  Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings to CAPT rubric

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector

 

 


 

 

Official, State Provided
READER RESPONSE RUBRIC

 

 
INITIAL UNDERSTANDING
DEVELOPING AN INTERPRETATION
CONNECTIONS
CRITICAL STANCE
Exceptional
6
Displays perceptive and insightful comprehension.
Displays exceptional reflective thinking about the text.
Displays perceptive associations between the text and/or outside experience.
Displays thoughtful judgments about the literary quality of the text and supports those judgments with evidence from the text and/or outside experience.
Commendable
5
Displays thoughtful comprehension but the interpretations may be less insightful than that of superior readers.
Displays reflective thinking about the text but may lack the deeper interpretations exhibited by superior readers.
Displays associations between the text and other texts and/or outside experience but the associations may not be as perceptive or thoughtful as those of superior readers.
Displays judgments about the literary quality of the text and usually supports those judgments with evidence.
Adequate
4
Displays a thoughtful and plausible interpretation of the text but the interpretation lacks the insight displayed by superior and excellent readers.
Displays some reflective thinking about the text but not the deeper interpretations exhibited by superior and excellent readers.
Displays some associations between the text and other texts and/or outside experience but the associations tend to be routine and predictable.
Displays judgments about the literary quality of the text but the judgments tend to be superficial
and/or not well supported.
Developing
3
Displays marginally acceptable comprehension but interpretation tends to be predictable and lacks insight.
Displays little reflective thinking about the text.
Displays associations between the text and other texts and/or outside experience that are superficial, lack depth of understanding, or lack support.
Displays judgments about the literary quality of the text that tend to be ritualistic and lack support.
Emerging
2
Displays a literal or superficial understanding of the text.
Displays little, if any, reflective thinking about the text.
Displays difficulty in making associations between the text and other texts and/or outside experience.
Displays judgments of literary quality that are superficial or emotional.
Insufficient
1
Displays very limited understanding and/or serious misunderstanding of the text.
Displays no or very little reflective thinking about the text or his/her ability to process the text.
Displays no meaningful associations between the text and other texts and/or outside experience.
Displays no awareness of or appreciation for aesthetic or literary features of the text.

 
 


 

 

Quick Reference
C.A.P.T SCORING RUBRIC

 

 
Understanding
Interpretation
Connection
Stance
6
perceptive and insightful
exceptional
perceptive
thoughtful and supported
5
thoughtful
thoughtful
thoughtful
thoughtful, usually supported
4
plausible
some
routine and predictable
superficial, not well supported
3
marginally acceptable
little
superficial
ritualistic
2
literal or superficial
little, if any
difficulty
superficial or emotional
1
misunderstanding
no
no
no

 
 


 

 

The Four Dimensions of Reader Response Theory Group Project LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will analyze the CAPT rubric and create means of demonstrating evidence in all dimensions

Major Activity

Analyze 4 dimensions

Purpose

Apply  Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings to CAPT dimensions

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, collaborative groups

 


 

 

The Four Dimensions of Reader Response Theory Group Project
1.       Form groups of four.
2.       Make a list of words, topics, and concepts that could be mentioned in each response. (each student should have four lists)

 

Understanding
Interpretation
Connection
Stance
Plot
Actions, events
Setting
Direct, indirect characterization
Protagonist
Antagonist
Conflict
Rising action
Turning point
Climax
Falling action
Resolution
Dénouement
 
 
Theme
Message
Meaning
Moral
Thoughts
Reflection
Reaction
Figure out
 
 
 
Comparisons
Associations
Connections
Similar themes
Similar conflicts
Similar life
Similar movies
Similar stories
Analogy
 
 
Quality
Good or bad
Style
Judgment
Evaluate Literary Devices
Personification
Similes
Symbolism
Imagery
Irony
Flashback
Metaphor
Literary Elements
Suspense
Descriptive words
Foreshadowing
Figurative language

 

 

3.       Develop four questions that will help students to demonstrate the four dimensions in their answers.
 
4.                               Brainstorm possible ways of answering the questions.
5.                               Divide the four questions among the members of your group.
6.                               Each member should write a one page response to one question using each one of the words, concepts, topics.

 

7.                               Review the responses as a group and make improvements.
8.                               Mark each example of evidence of the dimensions with a:
9.                               U = understanding
10.                           I = interpretation
11.                           C = connection
12.                           S = stance
13.                           Staple all four responses together.
Each member of your group will receive the same grade (unless the teacher sees that someone is not collaborating)

 

 


 

 

Generic Answers to the Four Dimensions LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will learn the four questions

Major Activity

Discuss the four dimensions. Review the rubric and expectations.

Write four generic responses using all the words from the dimension lists.

Purpose

Understanding of dimensions

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, collaborative groups

 


 

 

 

Evidence of the Four Dimensions LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will apply understanding of the CAPT rubric and four dimensions by gathering evidence from the text. Students will analyze the quality of the evidence using their understanding of the rubric.

Major Activity

Discuss the four dimensions. Review the rubric and expectations.

Create lists of evidence for each dimension.

Purpose

Apply textual evidence to dimensions.

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, short story

 


 

 

Understanding
Evidence from the text
Plot
Actions, events
Setting
Direct, indirect characterization
Protagonist
Antagonist Conflict
Rising action
Turning point
Climax
Falling action
Resolution
Dénouement
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 

 

Interpretation
Evidence from the text
 
Theme
Message Meaning
Moral
Thoughts
Reflection
Reaction
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 

 

Connection
Evidence from the text
Associations
Comparisons
Connections
Similar themes
Similar conflicts
Similar life
Similar movies
Similar stories
Analogy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 

 

Stance
Evidence from the text
Good or bad
Style
Quality
Judgment
Literary Devices
Personification
Similes
Symbolism
Imagery
Irony
Flashback
Metaphor
Literary Elements
Suspense
Descriptive words
Foreshadowing
Figurative language
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

The Four Questions LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will learn how to apply understanding of the four dimensions and rubric to the four standard CAPT questions.

Major Activity

Create four questions for the CAPT. Discuss the four standard questions. Review the rubric and expectations.

Purpose

Apply  Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings to CAPT questions

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, collaborative groups, CAPT rubric, CAPT questions

 


 

 

Write a question for each dimension of the
CAPT Response to Literature test.
Initial Understanding
 
Interpretation
 
Connection
 
Critical Stance
 

 
 

The following types of questions may appear on the
CAPT Response to Literature test.
Initial Understanding
What are your thoughts and questions about the story? You might reflect upon characters, their problems, and title or other ideas in the story.
Interpretation
How does the main character change from the beginning of the story to the end? What do you think causes the change?
Connection
What does this story say about people in general? In what ways does it remind you of people you have known or experiences you have had? You may also write about stories you have read or movies, works of art or television shows you have seen. Use examples from the stories to explain your thinking.
Critical Stance
How successful was the author in creating a good piece of literature? Use examples from the story to explain your thinking.  
 
How well do these questions relate to the dimensions?
If you answer these questions, will you score well on the rubric?
What can you do to score well on each question?
What are some problems you might have?
What are some traps you might fall into?

 


 

 

The TKM Interpretation Project LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will use TKM Interpretation Project to demonstrate CAPT proficiency

Major Activity

TKM Interpretation Project

Purpose

Apply  Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings to TKM Interpretation Project

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, collaborative groups

 


 

 

TKM Interpretation Project
·                                 Choose a quotation from the story that you feel has deep meaning.
·                                 Write it at the top of a piece of paper and type it into the website.
·                                 Discuss what you think the quotations mean as they relate to elements of the story such as characters or theme.
·                                 Write a one page CAPT response.
·                                 Interpretation
o                                                        Choose one of the following quotations from the story. Explain what you think the quotation means as it relates to elements of the story such as characters or theme.
Quote,
Themes
Three-finger Fred? "An' they chased him 'n' never could catch him 'cause they did'nt know what he looked like, an 'Atticus, when they finally saw him, why he hadn't done any of those things. . . . Atticus, he was real nice. Page#281.
Judging people, prejudice, relates to Boo, Atticus, Tom, kids, Dolphus, Scout, Mayella, Scout realizes that people's looks can be different from their personality. Perspective
"Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember, it's a sin to kill a mockingbird. Page#90.
Innocence, protecting the innocent, innocent people, with power comes responsibility, powerful have responsibility for the weak,
"Maybe he doesn't have anywhere to run off to" (144).
Boo, friends, loneliness, safety, fear, judgments, belonging, community, neighbors
Atticus is a gentlemen, just like me! Page 99
 
 
 
"You ask him, You’re the oldest" (64).
age?, gender? respect?
"But sometimes the bible in the hand of one man is worse than a whiskey bottle in the hand of-oh, of your father" (45).
fairness, prejudice, stereotype, religion, obsession, being consumed by faith, single-mindedness, open-mindedness,
"So if spitting in my face and threatening me saved Mayella Ewell, one extra beating that's something I'll gladly take" (pg.218)
caring, standing up, doing the difficult thing, doing what's right, battling ignorance,
"Atticus, he was real nice....." "Most people are, Scout, when you finally see them" (281).
relates to Boo also, difference between appearance and reality, what is in the inside can mean more than what is on the outside, the value of looking without judging, .perspective, ignorance, bias
"Well, it'd be sort of like shootin' a mocking bird, wouldn't it?" (276).
letting out a secret, sin, innocence, evil, picking on people, leave it alone, diversity, prejudice, tolerance, acceptance.
"Why couldn't I mash him?... Because they don't bother you" (238).
innocence, abuse of power, privilege
"Children are children, but they can spot an evasion quicker than adults, and evasion simply muddles 'em" (87).
innocence, truth, child world vs. adult world
"Dill said striking a match under a turtle is hateful" (14).
social pressures, conformity, acceptance, tolerance
"I'm gonna join the circus, and laugh my head off...You've got it backwards, clowns are sad, it's like folks laugh at them" (216).
the corruption and ugliness of the adult world

 
 

CAPT Tricks LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will show knowledge of reader response theory

Major Activity

CAPT Tricks

Purpose

Scaffold CAPT responses

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, notes

 
 

CAPT Response to Literature Tricks.
CAPT Question # 1: What are your thoughts and questions about the story?
Read the story and ask a question about something that seemed important. Answer the question. Repeat as necessary to reach one full page. Avoid literal answers. Answers should be thoughtful, interpretive, perceptive, and insightful. Do not ask a question unless you have an answer. Add other observations about UISC if necessary to fill the page.
CAPT Question # 2: How does the main character change from the beginning of the story to the end?
Match the events of the story to the major element of plot: Beginning, conflict, turning point, rising action, climax, resolution, falling action, and denouement. Describe the character change throughout the story as a result of these elements. Add a conclusion if necessary to fill the page.
CAPT Question # 3: What does this story say about people in general and what does it remind you of?
Connect to conflicts and themes. Show how the conflicts or themes of the story relate to conflicts or themes in your experience. Do not make literal connections to events, actions and characters. Add a conclusion if necessary to fill the page.
CAPT Question # 4: How successful was the author in creating a good piece of literature?
Begin with the definition: Good literature uses literary devices to support themes. Identify a literary device from the story and describe how it is used and how it supports a theme. Repeat. Try to cover at least three different theme ideas. Add a conclusion if necessary to fill the page.
 

 


 

 

Short Story LESSON PLAN

Essential Questions (see unit)

Essential Questions:

What is Holistic Scoring?

What are the Four Response To Literature Dimensions?

What is Initial Understanding?

What is Interpretation?

What are Connections?

What is Critical Stance?

What is the rubric and how is it applied?

In what ways is the CAPT important?

How does reading require specialized and unique strategies?

How do literary devices and conventions affect perspectives and messages in a work of literature?

How does the message of the text apply to the past historical events, personal lives and the world at large?

What conventions of standard written English are important to effective communication?

Learning Objectives (see unit)

Students will show knowledge of reader response theory

Major Activity

Read short story.

Annotate story.

Answer comprehension questions.

Apply understanding to CAPT questions.

Purpose

Assess essential understandings

Parameters

30 minutes adjusted as needed

 

Resources

Web site, data projector, story

 


 

 

"What I Want to be When I Grow Up" Questions
Initial Understanding
1.        What are your thoughts and questions about the story? You might reflect upon characters, their problems, and title or other ideas in the story.
Interpretation
2.        How does the main character change from the beginning of the story to the end? What do you think causes the change?
·          Choose one of the following quotations from the story. Explain what you think the quotation means as it relates to elements of the story such as the characters or the theme. Write the letter of the quotation you choose and your response in your answer booklet.
A.        ..."taking the bus is an education. It's a rare opportunity for people of all types and from all walks of life to be in an enforced environment that allows them to really get a close look at one another." She then adds, meaningfully, "Think of it as research for your life's work."
B.         He looked like a man who'd been struck by a thought that was almost too big to handle.
C.         "But I Can see I don't have to tell you that. You're different. You notice things."
Connection
3.        What does this story say about people in general? In what ways does it remind you of people you have known or experiences you have had? You may also write about stories you have read or movies ,works of art or television shows you have seen. Use examples from the stories to explain your thinking.
Critical Stance
4.        How successful was the author in creating a good piece of literature? Use examples from the story to explain your thinking.
 

 


 

 

 
1.        What does the ‘hastily written’ letter show us about the mother, and Andrew?
2.        Why does Andrew hate the bus?
3.        What is the main character’s name?
4.        What is so good about taking the bus?
5.        What does the mother think is research for Andrew’s life?
6.        How old is Andrew?
7.        What does Andrew notice about the girl who sat across from him?
8.        What does it say about Andrew that he lost track of time?
9.        Why was Andrew gasping?
10.     Why was Andrew shaking with humiliation?
11.     How did the blond act toward Andrew and how is it ironic?
12.     Who got on the bus two stops after Andrew?
13.     What makes Andrew crazy?
14.     Who got on the bus and sat next to the breath-stopping girl and how is he described?
15.     What was it about his joke that was so dumb?
16.     What did he ask the breath-stopping girl?
17.     How did he deal with her moving her seat?
18.     What did Andrew do to show that he was against the pork-chop man?
19.     What does Andrew have to put up with on the bus?
20.     What does Andrew show about himself by asking his mother to drive?
21.     What does he show about himself by blaming Gordon?
22.     Why do his hands get sweaty?
23.     What did the pork-chop man do to help him?
24.     What did Andrew realize about Earl when he came up close?
25.     What is Andrew supposed to realize about Earl when Earl misses his stop?
26.     What causes Earl to sit down “struck by a thought”?
27.     What does Earl think about city folk?
28.     What did Andrew agree with Earl about?
29.     What was Andrew afraid of when he left the bus?
30.     What did Andrew think about Earl’s eyes?
31.     What did Andrew do when Earl launched into another story?
32.     Why did Earl keep Andrew?
33.     What surprised Andrew about Earl’s handshake?
34.     What does Earl think we all have to do?
35.     What does Earl mean when he says that Andrew is different?

  

CAPT Review
·         Review the Essential Understanding.
·         Review the Essential Questions.
·         Review the rubric.
·         Read a story.
·         Write CAPT responses.
·         Review the importance of Understanding plot details.
o        Form a group of two and write out the plot details.
·         Review Interpretation, theme, message, and concepts.
·         Create a list of works read.
·         Review common themes.
·         Review Connection to themes.
·         Review Stance and literary devices.
·         List common literary devices.
·                                  

 


 

 

Notes from Response To Literature workshop Strategies

Question #1

·          Do not answer the first part of the question: “What are your thoughts and questions about the story?”

·          Answer the second part of the question: “You might reflect on…”

·          Explain why you think the character acts the way he/she does.

 

Question #2 Interpretation

·          Give your opinion of the character’s personality at the beginning of the story.

·          Support your opinion with evidence or examples from the story.

·          Explain how the character changes.

·          Support your explanation with evidence or examples from the story.

 

Question #3 Connection

·          Make a statement about what this story shows about people.

·          Give an example(s) from the story to support your opinion.

·          Make 2-3 connections: personal, movies, tv, other stories or novels.

·          Be sure to say how the connection is similar to the story—this is called “the link back”.

 

Question #4 Stance

·          Try to give two or three reasons of why this is good literature.

·          Things you can discuss:

1.        Imagery—you can  really see the setting or characters

2.        Author’s use of description and detail—makes you feel like you are really “in” the story

3.        Suspense—you want to keep reading to see what happens

4.        Easy to relate to the main problem

5.        Empathy—you can really feel for the main character

6.        Theme—you can learn from the theme

7.        Symbolism—the symbol gave the story more meaning

8.        The character is believable

·          Support your reasons with examples from the text

 

 


 

 

Little Red Riding hood

Name___________________________

1.                 U  What happens is the basic plot of Little Red Riding hood? Who are the main characters? What is the setting? What questions do you have about Red and her situation?

 

 

 

2.        I What is the deeper meaning of the story?  What was the message, moral or theme of the story? How did the main character change from beginning to end?

 

 

2B. I What were some symbols in the story and what did they mean?

 

2C.I. What is 1 important quote from the story? What does it mean?

 

3.        C. What other stories, movies, songs, etc can you relate to the story? What does it say about kids, adults, people in general?

 

 

 

 

S. Is it a good story?  Why or why not?  In other words, what made it a good or bad story

4.        ?